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Greetings,

A site I designed was compromised today, working on damage control at the moment. Two user accounts, including the primary administrator, were accessed without authorization. Please take a look at the log-in script that was in use, any insight on security holes would be appreciated. I am not sure if this was an SQL injection or possibly breach on a computer that had been used to access this area in the past.

Thanks

<?php
    //Start session
    session_start();
    //Include DB config
    require_once('config.php');

    //Error message array
    $errmsg_arr = array();
    $errflag = false;
    //Connect to mysql server
    $link = mysql_connect(DB_HOST, DB_USER, DB_PASSWORD);
    if(!$link) {
        die('Failed to connect to server: ' . mysql_error());
    }
    //Select database
    $db = mysql_select_db(DB_DATABASE);
    if(!$db) {
        die("Unable to select database");
    }

    //Function to sanitize values received from the form. Prevents SQL injection
    function clean($str) {
        $str = @trim($str);
        if(get_magic_quotes_gpc()) {
            $str = stripslashes($str);
        }
        return mysql_real_escape_string($str);
    }
    //Sanitize the POST values
    $login = clean($_POST['login']);
    $password = clean($_POST['password']);

    //Input Validations
    if($login == '') {
        $errmsg_arr[] = 'Login ID missing';
        $errflag = true;
    }
    if($password == '') {
        $errmsg_arr[] = 'Password missing';
        $errflag = true;
    }

    //If there are input validations, redirect back to the login form
    if($errflag) {
        $_SESSION['ERRMSG_ARR'] = $errmsg_arr;
        session_write_close();
        header("location: http://somewhere.com");
        exit();
    }

    //Create query
    $qry="SELECT * FROM user_control WHERE username='$login' AND password='".md5($_POST['password'])."'";
    $result=mysql_query($qry);

    //Check whether the query was successful or not
    if($result) {
        if(mysql_num_rows($result) == 1) {
            //Login Successful
            session_regenerate_id();
            //Collect details about user and assign session details
            $member = mysql_fetch_assoc($result);
            $_SESSION['SESS_MEMBER_ID'] = $member['user_id'];
            $_SESSION['SESS_USERNAME'] = $member['username'];
            $_SESSION['SESS_FIRST_NAME'] = $member['name_f'];
            $_SESSION['SESS_LAST_NAME'] = $member['name_l'];
            $_SESSION['SESS_STATUS'] = $member['status'];
            $_SESSION['SESS_LEVEL'] = $member['level'];
            //Get Last Login
            $_SESSION['SESS_LAST_LOGIN'] = $member['lastLogin'];
            //Set Last Login info
            $qry = "UPDATE user_control SET lastLogin = DATE_ADD(NOW(), INTERVAL 1 HOUR) WHERE user_id = $member[user_id]";
            $login = mysql_query($qry) or die(mysql_error());
            session_write_close();
            if ($member['level'] != "3" || $member['status'] == "Suspended") {
                header("location: http://somewhere.com");
            } else {
                header("location: http://somewhere.com");
            }
            exit();
        }else {
            //Login failed
            header("location: http://somewhere.com");
            exit();
        }
    }else {
        die("Query failed");
    }
?>

UPDATE

Here is an updated version of the security script, please let me know what you think. Added a little SALT and a table to block both IP addresses (disabling the login form itself) and individual users after failing to authenticate four times. A Mayday email is also sent to an Admin and the user is notified that they have exceeded the limit.

Any critiques would be appreciated!

<?php
    //Start session
    session_start();
    //Include DB config
    include $_SERVER['DOCUMENT_ROOT'] . '/includes/pdo_conn.inc.php';

    //Error message array
    $errmsg_arr = array();
    $errflag = false;

    //Function to sanitize values received from the form. Prevents SQL injection
    function clean($str) {
        $str = @trim($str);
        if(get_magic_quotes_gpc()) {
            $str = stripslashes($str);
        }
        return $str;
    }

    //Define a SALT
    define('SALT', 'heylookitssuperman');

    //Sanitize the POST values
    $login = clean($_POST['login']);
    $password = clean($_POST['password']);
    //Encrypt password
    $encryptedPassword = md5(SALT . $password);
    //Input Validations
    //Obtain IP address and check for past failed attempts
    $ip_address = $_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR'];
    $checkIPBan = $db->prepare("SELECT COUNT(*) FROM ip_ban WHERE ipAddr = ? OR login = ?");
    $checkIPBan->execute(array($ip_address, $login));
    $numAttempts = $checkIPBan->fetchColumn();
    //If there are 4 failed attempts, send back to login and temporarily ban IP address
    if ($numAttempts == 1) {
        $getTotalAttempts = $db->prepare("SELECT attempts FROM ip_ban WHERE ipAddr = ? OR login = ?");
        $getTotalAttempts->execute(array($ip_address, $login));
        $totalAttempts = $getTotalAttempts->fetch();
        $totalAttempts = $totalAttempts['attempts'];
        if ($totalAttempts >= 4) {
            //Send Mayday SMS
            $to = "admin@somewhere.com";
            $subject = "Banned Account - $login";
            $mailheaders = 'From: noreply@somewhere.com' . "\r\n";
            $mailheaders .= 'Reply-To: noreply@somewhere.com' . "\r\n";
            $mailheaders .= 'MIME-Version: 1.0' . "\r\n";
            $mailheaders .= 'Content-type: text/html; charset=iso-8859-1' . "\r\n";
            $msg = "<p>IP Address - " . $ip_address . ", Username - " . $login . "</p>";
            mail($to, $subject, $msg, $mailheaders);
            $setAccountBan = $db->query("UPDATE ip_ban SET isBanned = 1 WHERE ipAddr = '$ip_address'");
            $setAccountBan->execute();
            $errmsg_arr[] = 'Too Many Login Attempts';
            $errflag = true;    
        }
    }
    if($login == '') {
        $errmsg_arr[] = 'Login ID missing';
        $errflag = true;
    }
    if($password == '') {
        $errmsg_arr[] = 'Password missing';
        $errflag = true;
    }

    //If there are input validations, redirect back to the login form
    if($errflag) {
        $_SESSION['ERRMSG_ARR'] = $errmsg_arr;
        session_write_close();
        header('Location: http://somewhere.com/login.php');
        exit();
    }

    //Query database
    $loginSQL = $db->prepare("SELECT password FROM user_control WHERE username = ?");
    $loginSQL->execute(array($login));
    $loginResult = $loginSQL->fetch();

    //Compare passwords
    if($loginResult['password'] == $encryptedPassword) {
        //Login Successful
        session_regenerate_id();
        //Collect details about user and assign session details
        $getMemDetails = $db->prepare("SELECT * FROM user_control WHERE username = ?");
        $getMemDetails->execute(array($login));
        $member = $getMemDetails->fetch();
        $_SESSION['SESS_MEMBER_ID'] = $member['user_id'];
        $_SESSION['SESS_USERNAME'] = $member['username'];
        $_SESSION['SESS_FIRST_NAME'] = $member['name_f'];
        $_SESSION['SESS_LAST_NAME'] = $member['name_l'];
        $_SESSION['SESS_STATUS'] = $member['status'];
        $_SESSION['SESS_LEVEL'] = $member['level'];
        //Get Last Login
        $_SESSION['SESS_LAST_LOGIN'] = $member['lastLogin'];
        //Set Last Login info
        $updateLog = $db->prepare("UPDATE user_control SET lastLogin = DATE_ADD(NOW(), INTERVAL 1 HOUR), ip_addr = ? WHERE user_id = ?");
        $updateLog->execute(array($ip_address, $member['user_id']));
        session_write_close();
        //If there are past failed log-in attempts, delete old entries
        if ($numAttempts > 0) {
            //Past failed log-ins from this IP address. Delete old entries
            $deleteIPBan = $db->prepare("DELETE FROM ip_ban WHERE ipAddr = ?");
            $deleteIPBan->execute(array($ip_address));
        }
        if ($member['level'] != "3" || $member['status'] == "Suspended") {
            header("location: http://somewhere.com");
        } else {
            header('Location: http://somewhere.com');
        }
        exit();
    } else {
        //Login failed. Add IP address and other details to ban table
        if ($numAttempts < 1) {
        //Add a new entry to IP Ban table
        $addBanEntry = $db->prepare("INSERT INTO ip_ban (ipAddr, login, attempts) VALUES (?,?,?)");
        $addBanEntry->execute(array($ip_address, $login, 1));
        } else {
            //increment Attempts count 
            $updateBanEntry = $db->prepare("UPDATE ip_ban SET ipAddr = ?, login = ?, attempts = attempts+1 WHERE ipAddr = ? OR login = ?");
            $updateBanEntry->execute(array($ip_address, $login, $ip_address, $login));
        }
        header('Location: http://somewhere.com/login.php');
        exit();
    }
?>
share|improve this question
    
There's one very simple solution against SQL injection: Stored Procedures. Using stored procedures an attacker many kind of string, it will only execute using the very same statements you intended. Of course this doesn't protect from business errors, like exposed cookies, session takeover and the like. But it avoids all the problems associated with manually building SQL statements. –  datenwolf Jan 2 '11 at 1:20
1  
The correct answer to your question is: Never. No matter what you create, it will never be secure. Do your best to not be the "low-hanging fruit" and keep an eye on all data-access points. As far as the script is concerned, I highly recommend learning/using prepared statements (aka stored procedures) whenever possible, as it not only prevents SQL injection, it also improves data-access rates (database caching etc). –  zzzzBov Jan 2 '11 at 1:38
1  
Thought i'd also add: +1 for being pro-active about security. It shows a level of maturity as a developer to be willing to identify what you don't know, and another level of maturity to ask for help. –  zzzzBov Jan 2 '11 at 1:45
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This is by no means comprehensive, and may include elements of general review:

  • The die() call upon a connection failure calls out to mysql_error(), which may leak sensitive information (database host, username)
  • In general, always try to pass the second argument (the connection handle) to mysql_real_escape_string(), which allows it to ensure that the value is properly escaped with regards to the character set et al. of the connection
  • Your header() call contains the string "location"; the correct header name is "Location"
  • You sanitise $_POST['password'] but then inject it back into the SQL with md5( $_POST['password'] ); although (due to the behaviour of md5()) this won't introduce a vulnerability, it would potentially break in an environment where get_magic_quotes_gpc() was switched on, and is just a bit inconsistent
  • Your call to mysql_query() doesn't specify the connection handle - although in this script, there's unlikely to be another one lying around, I like to be explicit when talking to MySQL - it gives me the warm fuzzies

You appear to be storing passwords hashed - good - though using MD5 (not so good, arguably), but with no salting of any kind - this means that if someone's gotten hold of your password hashes, then they could use rainbow tables/brute force to try to crack passwords. That said, you may argue (and I'd happily accept) that if someone's got onto the box and obtained that data, then you have other potential problems.

I'd recommend having a read of http://chargen.matasano.com/chargen/2007/9/7/enough-with-the-rainbow-tables-what-you-need-to-know-about-s.html, which will explain why a per-user salt will help, and the real reason MD5 is probably not the best choice for a password hashing function any more.

Without wanting to step outside the scope of this answer, and speculate too much; could session hijacking be the culprit here? (I don't know anything about how your sessions are resumed, but it seems reasonable your code may be "trusting" the session data. Of course, this is not easy to defeat for certain - tying sessions to IP addresses is a good start, for instance.)

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you so much for your words of wisdom. Looks like it is long past time for an upgrade in that code and I am kicking myself for not staying on top of it. But I suppose this is how we learn as developers, right? As far as session hijacking, not terribly likely in this case but your IP address suggestion is a good one, I will be implementing that as well. Thanks again! –  NightMICU Jan 2 '11 at 1:35
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I'm no SQL expert, but I know that it is generally not a good security practice to store passwords (or hashes of passwords) in a database. It's typically MORE secure to encrypt a file with the password, then accept the password through the form and try to decrypt it using a hash of the password. That way; no information about the password itself is ever stored on the server's hard disk, and no one can decrypt the file (or database entry) without the password, even if they had physical access to the server or access to the database file.

share|improve this answer
    
This is for a site with multiple users. The password is stored in MD5 encryption and encrypted at login, comparing the two MD5 encrypted passwords. –  NightMICU Jan 2 '11 at 1:11
    
You shouldn't be encrypting user passwords at all -- you should be salting and hashing them. Hashes can not be reversed, proper salts invalidate brute force attacks or rainbow tables for properly strong passwords. –  Erik Jan 2 '11 at 1:18
    
Brute force attacks in general won't be hurt by adding salt. Cause it simply can try random credentials until if finds the right ones. –  PeeHaa Jan 2 '11 at 1:24
    
It would appear that the site's MySQL database table containing user log-in credentials was not compromised, the individual simply logged in to the site's CMS. This made me think about the possibility of SQL injection, although the script in use should have prevented that. The second account to be compromised belongs to someone that never uses the system, which is odd. –  NightMICU Jan 2 '11 at 1:28
1  
I think Erik meant brute force attacks against the password hashes themselves, which are made exponentially harder against salted ("nonced") hashes, and is the reason a vanilla rainbow table becomes useless. –  Rob Jan 2 '11 at 1:28
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You can add salt to the passwords stored to prevent dictionary and rainbowtables attacks.

You could also store passwords in a stronger hash/encryption hashes instead of MD5.

Check out for example: http://www.codinghorror.com/blog/2007/09/youre-probably-storing-passwords-incorrectly.html

You can also temporary suspend ipaddresses if too many login attempts failed. For lets say an hour.

This way you can prevent bruteforce attacks. Well not really prevent it, it at least makes it a lot harder.

share|improve this answer
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