Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a class called GraphView that extends UIView that basically draws a small little line chart. I need one of these graphs at the top of each section in my UITableView. So I tried by creating a separate cell at the top of one of my sections and then on that cell I did:

[cell.contentView addSubview:graphView];
[graphView release];

But when I scroll down, it's like the graph is glitchy and it shows up in random spots along the UITableView. Anyone have ideas or insight? Is there a better way to incorporate another UIView into the top of each section in my UITableView?

- (UITableViewCell *)tableView:(UITableView *)theTableView cellForRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath {
    //NSLog(@"cellForrowAtIndexPath");
    static NSString *CellIdentifier = @"Cell";

    UITableViewCell *cell = [theTableView dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier:CellIdentifier];
    if (cell == nil) {
        cell = [[[UITableViewCell alloc] initWithStyle:UITableViewCellStyleValue1 reuseIdentifier:CellIdentifier] autorelease];
    }
    cell.selectionStyle = UITableViewCellSelectionStyleNone;
    cell.textLabel.font = [UIFont systemFontOfSize:12];
    cell.detailTextLabel.font = [UIFont systemFontOfSize:12];


    NSString *str1, *str2;
    if(indexPath.section == 0) {
        if(indexPath.row == 0) {

            str1 = @"";
            str2 = @"";

            S7GraphView *graphView = [[S7GraphView alloc] initWithFrame:CGRectMake(10,0,310,100)];
            graphView.dataSource = self;

            NSNumberFormatter *numberFormatter = [NSNumberFormatter new];
            [numberFormatter setNumberStyle:NSNumberFormatterDecimalStyle];
            [numberFormatter setMinimumFractionDigits:0];
            [numberFormatter setMaximumFractionDigits:0];

            graphView.yValuesFormatter = numberFormatter;

            NSDateFormatter *dateFormatter = [NSDateFormatter new];
            [dateFormatter setTimeStyle:NSDateFormatterNoStyle];
            [dateFormatter setDateStyle:NSDateFormatterShortStyle];

            graphView.xValuesFormatter = dateFormatter;

            [dateFormatter release];        
            [numberFormatter release];

            graphView.backgroundColor = [UIColor whiteColor];

            graphView.drawAxisX = NO;
            graphView.drawAxisY = YES;
            graphView.drawGridX = NO;
            graphView.drawGridY = YES;

            graphView.xValuesColor = [UIColor blackColor];
            graphView.yValuesColor = [UIColor blackColor];

            graphView.gridXColor = [UIColor blackColor];
            graphView.gridYColor = [UIColor blackColor];

            graphView.drawInfo = NO;
            graphView.info = @"Load";
            graphView.infoColor = [UIColor whiteColor];


            //When you need to update the data, make this call:

            //[graphView reloadData];

            //S7GraphView *graphView = [[S7GraphView alloc] initWithFrame:CGRectMake(10,0,320,300)];
            //self.graphView.dataSource = self;
            [cell.contentView addSubview:graphView];
            [graphView release];
        }
share|improve this question
    
possible duplicate of How to put a UIView in a UITableView –  mvds Jan 2 '11 at 0:55
    
@Robert: Please don't duplicate your questions while people are trying to answer them. –  mvds Jan 2 '11 at 0:57
    
this sounds like a cell-reuse issue. please post ur tableView:cellForRowAtIndexPath: –  vikingosegundo Jan 2 '11 at 0:58
    
It's not a duplicate question. I figured out how to add the UIView. Now I have a separate issue... –  CodeGuy Jan 2 '11 at 0:59
    
There is no duplicate of cells. The UIView and the [cell.contentView addSubview:graphView] is only called when indexPath.section == 0 and indexPath.row == 0 as well. –  CodeGuy Jan 2 '11 at 1:00

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I've solved using tags:

- (UITableViewCell *)tableView:(UITableView *)theTableView cellForRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath {

    static NSString *CellIdentifier = @"Cell";

    UITableViewCell *cell = [theTableView dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier:CellIdentifier];
    if (cell == nil) {
        cell = [[[UITableViewCell alloc] initWithStyle:UITableViewCellStyleValue1 reuseIdentifier:CellIdentifier] autorelease];
    }
    else{
      [[cell.contentView viewWithTag:500] removeFromSuperview];
    }

    ...

    graphView.tag = 500;
    [cell.contentView addSubview:graphView];

}

share|improve this answer
1  
Thank you so much, you probably saved me an hour of frustration! –  lppier Aug 28 at 7:28

This is, as I thought, a cell-reuse issue:

each time, tableView:cellForRowAtIndexPath: get executed, you add another instance of GraphView. In combination with cell-reuse, where cell-objects get reassigned to other indexPaths, this leads to great trouble.

You should add subviews only inside if (cell == nil).

You'll have to keep track or your GraphViews seperately. Either by adding them to a NSDictionary with the indexPaths as key, or by subclassing UITableViewCell.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm still not certain of what you mean. So add an if statement o see if cell==nil before the cell.contentView addSubview call? And what do you mean regarding tracking GraphViews? –  CodeGuy Jan 2 '11 at 1:36

A table view works slightly differently than you might expect at first. Basically, only the cells that you see are actually loaded into memory. If you think about it, it makes sense - if you had 10,000 items in your table, all loaded into memory, your app is going run out of memory and crash pretty quickly.

When you scroll, your cells are created in real time. The confusing part: your cells aren't created from scratch, instead iOS just takes a cell that has just left the screen and sends it through

- (UITableViewCell *)tableView:(UITableView *)theTableView cellForRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath 

again. So, the subview you added to your top cell won't be removed when that cell gets reused further down as you scroll. Short answer: make sure you remove/reset the subview in the function above, this way you will 'reset' any used cells that are being reused further down the table view.

Why does iOS do it this way? Efficiency - basically, it is very expensive to create a tableview cell. Finding the width, color, drawing the shape... + lots more takes a lot of cpu power and time. It is far more efficient to reuse cells each time rather than start from scratch.

So reset only the necessary fields of a cell in your cell creation function. This way, you'll have smooth and quick scrolling, but views/properties of your cell will be reset before the cell is reused.

Confusing at first? Yup. But definitely the better way to do it.

share|improve this answer
    
thank you very much. Would you mind explaining how I can "remove/reset the subview in the function above" like you said? So basically I would create the subview prior to the cellForRowAtIndexPath method. Then what would I have inside the method? –  CodeGuy Jan 2 '11 at 16:05
    
Inside the cellForRowAtIndexPath method, after the "if (cell == nil)" part, reset your subview like so: [cell.contentView.view removeFromSuperview]; But, you also need to create the subview in the case that the cell actually is at the top of the row. So later on, in the same cellForRowAtIndexPath method, have some code to do the following: if(indexPath.row == 0) { //create graph view and add it to cell's content view here. } –  Jordan Jan 3 '11 at 5:54
    
so you're saying: if(cell==nil) {[cell.contentView removeFromSuperview];} else { create view and [cell.contentView addSubview:graphView.view]; }? This doesn't work. –  CodeGuy Jan 3 '11 at 18:05
    
Not quite what I meant. Will write it out as an answer rather than try and put it in a comment! –  Jordan Jan 4 '11 at 2:04

Ok like this:

static NSString *CellIdentifier = @"Cell";   

UITableViewCell *cell = [tableView dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier:CellIdentifier]; 
if (cell == nil) 
    {
        cell = [[[UITableViewCell alloc] initWithStyle:UITableViewCellStyleValue1 reuseIdentifier:CellIdentifier] autorelease];
    }

//now remove any subview a reused cell might have:   
[cell.contentView.view removeFromSuperview];   
//and in part of the method, you'll need to create the subview if the cell is in the top row.

if (indexPath.row == 0)
{
    [cell.contentView.view addSubview:graphView.view];
}

It could be slightly different in your case because of the graph view rather than a UIView. But this is definitely the basis of what it should look like.

Hope that helps!

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.