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I need to merge consecutive repeating elements in an array, such that

[1, 2, 2, 3, 1]

becomes

[1, 2, 3, 1]

#uniq doesn't work for this purpose. Why? Because #uniq will produce this:

[1, 2, 3]
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why doesnt uniq work? are you using uniq or uniq!? –  sethvargo Jan 2 '11 at 1:27
    
See also the duplicate question Eliminate consecutive duplicates of list elements. –  Phrogz Aug 1 '12 at 12:50

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted
def remove_consecutive_duplicates(xs)
  [xs.first] + xs.each_cons(2).select do |x,y|
    x != y
  end.map(&:last)
end

remove_consecutive_duplicates([1, 2, 2, 3, 1])
#=> [1,2,3,1]

This returns a new array like uniq does and works in O(n) time.

share|improve this answer
    
Seriously, well done. each_cons(2).select indeed! –  Phrogz Jan 2 '11 at 4:07
    
Did not know of each_cons, nice one! –  Toby Hede Feb 23 '11 at 0:56
2  
xs.chunk { |x| x }.map(&:first) –  tokland Nov 12 '11 at 15:31

Using Enumerable#chunk:

xs = [1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 1]
xs.chunk { |x| x }.map(&:first)
#=> [1, 2, 3, 1]

Using a modern Ruby you can also write this:

xs.chunk(&:itself).map(&:first)

Also, a custom imperative implementation that creates no intermediate values:

xs.reduce([]) { |acc, x| acc.last == x ? acc : acc << x }
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1  
Far shorter, cleaner and more efficient than the accepted answer. –  Sim Sep 7 '14 at 3:22

sepp2k's answer is already accepted, but here are some alternatives:

# Because I love me some monkeypatching
class Array
  def remove_consecutive_duplicates_2
    # Because no solution is complete without inject
    inject([]){ |r,o| r << o unless r.last==o; r }
  end

  def remove_consecutive_duplicates_3
    # O(2n)
    map.with_index{ |o,i| o if i==0 || self[i-1]!=o }.compact
  end

  def remove_consecutive_duplicates_4
    # Truly O(n)
    result = []
    last   = nil
    each do |o|
      result << o unless last==o
      last = o
    end
    result
  end
end

And although performance is not everything, here are some benchmarks:

Rehearsal --------------------------------------------
sepp2k     2.740000   0.010000   2.750000 (  2.734665)
Phrogz_2   1.410000   0.000000   1.410000 (  1.420978)
Phrogz_3   1.520000   0.020000   1.540000 (  1.533197)
Phrogz_4   1.000000   0.000000   1.000000 (  0.997460)
----------------------------------- total: 6.700000sec

               user     system      total        real
sepp2k     2.780000   0.000000   2.780000 (  2.782354)
Phrogz_2   1.450000   0.000000   1.450000 (  1.440868)
Phrogz_3   1.530000   0.020000   1.550000 (  1.539190)
Phrogz_4   1.020000   0.000000   1.020000 (  1.025331)

Benchmarks run on removing duplicates from orig = (0..1000).map{ rand(5) } 10,000 times.

share|improve this answer

does !uniq not work for what you are doing?

http://ruby-doc.org/docs/ProgrammingRuby/html/ref_c_array.html

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1  
-1 1.) he SAID in his answer that it doesn't work and 2.) its uniq! not !uniq –  sethvargo Jan 2 '11 at 1:29
1  
!uniq is not a valid method name in ruby. uniq! does the same thing as uniq, but in-place. So it's not what the OP wants (since he only wants to remove consecutive duplicates). –  sepp2k Jan 2 '11 at 1:29
    
Didnt notice the "consecutive" duplicate requirement. OP might want to explicity state that. –  Paula Bean Jan 2 '11 at 1:31
    
I just added this clarification. Thanks. –  dan Jan 2 '11 at 1:32

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