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I guess it is not possible to set stroke property such as CSS which is quite easy. With CSS we have dashed, dotted, solid but on canvas when drawing lines/or strokes this doesn't seem to be an option. How have you implemented this?

I've seen some examples but they are really long for such a silly function.

For example:

http://groups.google.com/group/javascript-information-visualization-toolkit/browse_thread/thread/22000c0d0a1c54f9?pli=1

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11 Answers

up vote 51 down vote accepted

Fun question! I've written a custom implementation of dashed lines; you can try it out here. I took the route of Adobe Illustrator and allow you to specify an array of dash/gap lengths.

For stackoverflow posterity, here's my implementation (slightly altered for s/o line widths):

var CP = window.CanvasRenderingContext2D && CanvasRenderingContext2D.prototype;
if (CP && CP.lineTo){
  CP.dashedLine = function(x,y,x2,y2,dashArray){
    if (!dashArray) dashArray=[10,5];
    if (dashLength==0) dashLength = 0.001; // Hack for Safari
    var dashCount = dashArray.length;
    this.moveTo(x, y);
    var dx = (x2-x), dy = (y2-y);
    var slope = dx ? dy/dx : 1e15;
    var distRemaining = Math.sqrt( dx*dx + dy*dy );
    var dashIndex=0, draw=true;
    while (distRemaining>=0.1){
      var dashLength = dashArray[dashIndex++%dashCount];
      if (dashLength > distRemaining) dashLength = distRemaining;
      var xStep = Math.sqrt( dashLength*dashLength / (1 + slope*slope) );
      if (dx<0) xStep = -xStep;
      x += xStep
      y += slope*xStep;
      this[draw ? 'lineTo' : 'moveTo'](x,y);
      distRemaining -= dashLength;
      draw = !draw;
    }
  }
}

To draw a line from 20,150 to 170,10 with dashes that are 30px long followed by a gap of 10px, you would use:

myContext.dashedLine(20,150,170,10,[30,10]);

To draw alternating dashes and dots, use (for example):

myContext.lineCap   = 'round';
myContext.lineWidth = 4; // Lines 4px wide, dots of diameter 4
myContext.dashedLine(20,150,170,10,[30,10,0,10]);

The "very short" dash length of 0 combined with the rounded lineCap results in dots along your line.

If anyone knows of a way to access the current point of a canvas context path, I'd love to know about it, as it would allow me to write this as ctx.dashTo(x,y,dashes) instead of requiring you to re-specify the start point in the method call.

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This is so crazy for dotted line:). Very cool solution! –  Dark Passenger Jan 2 '11 at 6:07
1  
@Sam You're not the only one who thinks that we should not have been made to do this much work to draw dotted lines on Canvas: lists.whatwg.org/pipermail/whatwg-whatwg.org/2007-May/… –  Phrogz Jan 2 '11 at 6:16
1  
@Jon JavaScript's "boolean operators" are actually "guard operators". Using short-circuit evaluation they return whichever value's 'truthiness' is evaluated last. Here are some true statements: 42 == 42 || "hi"; "hi" == false || "hi"; true == 17 && true; false == 17 && false; "" == "" && false. Open up your friendly developer console and experiment for yourself. :) The first line sets CP to the prototype if CanvasRenderingContext2D exists, otherwise it sets it to undefined. –  Phrogz Apr 25 '11 at 22:57
4  
When the difference in x coordinates is 0, you're dividing by zero and it doesn't work. –  Honza Brabec May 5 '13 at 13:30
1  
@HonzaBrabec Yes, you're right. That's fixed with the 1e15 hack. There are other cleaner ways to do it, but this requires the least code changes and is sufficiently effective. –  Phrogz Oct 21 '13 at 14:59
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This simplified version of Phrogz's code utilises the built-in transformation functionality of Canvas and also handles special cases e.g. when dx = 0

var CP = window.CanvasRenderingContext2D && CanvasRenderingContext2D.prototype;
if (CP.lineTo) {
    CP.dashedLine = function(x, y, x2, y2, da) {
        if (!da) da = [10,5];
        this.save();
        var dx = (x2-x), dy = (y2-y);
        var len = Math.sqrt(dx*dx + dy*dy);
        var rot = Math.atan2(dy, dx);
        this.translate(x, y);
        this.moveTo(0, 0);
        this.rotate(rot);       
        var dc = da.length;
        var di = 0, draw = true;
        x = 0;
        while (len > x) {
            x += da[di++ % dc];
            if (x > len) x = len;
            draw ? this.lineTo(x, 0): this.moveTo(x, 0);
            draw = !draw;
        }       
        this.restore();
    }
}

I think my calculations are correct and it seems to render OK.

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Just wanted to mention that Phrogz's solution isn't working for vertical lines. This solution works. –  bits Feb 9 '12 at 19:04
    
Yup this solution support Tranformation and scaling –  user960567 Mar 28 '12 at 12:24
1  
Might be good to guard against a dashedLine function already being defined: CP.dashedLine = CP.dashedLine || function... –  Drew Noakes Nov 17 '12 at 18:39
1  
I made a fiddle of this: jsfiddle.net/4esFX/2 –  Joshua Dec 3 '12 at 6:00
1  
smart use of rotate! :) –  JohnS Jun 16 '13 at 2:42
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Mozilla has been working on an implementation of dashed stroking for canvas, so we may see it added to the spec in the near future.

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VERIFIED FIXED a few months ago. –  antony.trupe Aug 30 '12 at 0:58
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Phroz's solution is great. But when I used it in my application, I found two bugs.

Following code is debugged (and refactored for readability) version of Phroz's one.

// Fixed: Minus xStep bug (when x2 < x, original code bugs)
// Fixed: Vertical line bug (when abs(x - x2) is zero, original code bugs because of NaN)
var CP = window.CanvasRenderingContext2D && CanvasRenderingContext2D.prototype;
if(CP && CP.lineTo) CP.dashedLine = function(x, y, x2, y2, dashArray){
    if(! dashArray) dashArray=[10,5];
    var dashCount = dashArray.length;
    var dx = (x2 - x);
    var dy = (y2 - y);
    var xSlope = (Math.abs(dx) > Math.abs(dy));
    var slope = (xSlope) ? dy / dx : dx / dy;

    this.moveTo(x, y);
    var distRemaining = Math.sqrt(dx * dx + dy * dy);
    var dashIndex = 0;
    while(distRemaining >= 0.1){
        var dashLength = Math.min(distRemaining, dashArray[dashIndex % dashCount]);
        var step = Math.sqrt(dashLength * dashLength / (1 + slope * slope));
        if(xSlope){
            if(dx < 0) step = -step;
            x += step
            y += slope * step;
        }else{
            if(dy < 0) step = -step;
            x += slope * step;
            y += step;
        }
        this[(dashIndex % 2 == 0) ? 'lineTo' : 'moveTo'](x, y);
        distRemaining -= dashLength;
        dashIndex++;
    }
}
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what bugs did you find? –  rroche Nov 23 '12 at 20:31
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There's a much simpler way to do this. According to http://www.w3.org/TR/2dcontext/#dom-context-2d-strokestyle strokeStyle accepts strings, CanvasGradients, or CanvasPatterns. So we just take an image like this:

  <img src="images/dashedLineProto.jpg" id="cvpattern1" width="32" height="32" />

load it into a canvas, and draw our little rectangle with it.

  var img=document.getElementById("cvpattern1");
  var pat=ctx.createPattern(img,"repeat");
  ctx.strokeStyle = pat;
  ctx.strokeRect(20,20,150,100);

that doesnt result in a perfect dashed line, but it's really straightforward and modifiable. Results may of course become imperfect when you're drawing lines which arent horizontal or vertical, a dotted pattern might help there.

PS. keep in mind SOP applies when you're trying to use imgs from external sources in your code.

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At the moment at least setLineDash([5,10]) works with Chrome and ctx.mozDash = [5,10] works with FF:

var c=document.getElementById("myCanvas");
var ctx=c.getContext("2d");

if ( ctx.setLineDash !== undefined )   ctx.setLineDash([5,10]);
if ( ctx.mozDash !== undefined )       ctx.mozDash = [5,10];

ctx.beginPath();              
ctx.lineWidth="2";
ctx.strokeStyle="green";
ctx.moveTo(0,75);
ctx.lineTo(250,75);
ctx.stroke();

Setting to null makes the line solid.

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There is currently no support in HTML5 Canvas specification for dashed lines.

check this out:

http://davidowens.wordpress.com/2010/09/07/html-5-canvas-and-dashed-lines/

or

Check out the Raphael JS Library:

http://raphaeljs.com/

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There are support for it in Firefox at least

ctx.mozDash = [5,10];

seems like ctx.webkitLineDash worked before, but they removed it because it had some compabillity issues.

The W3C specs says ctx.setLineDash([5,10]); but it doesn't seem to be implemented yet anywhere.

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thanks for the update –  rroche Nov 23 '12 at 20:30
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I found properties mozDash and mozDashOffset in Mozilla specification:
http://mxr.mozilla.org/mozilla-central/source/dom/interfaces/canvas/nsIDOMCanvasRenderingContext2D.idl

They're probaly used to control dashes, but i haven't used them.

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I made modified the dashedLine function to add support for offsetting. It utilizes native dashed lines if the browser supports ctx.setLineDash and ctx.lineDashOffset.

Example: http://jsfiddle.net/mLY8Q/6/

var CP = window.CanvasRenderingContext2D && CanvasRenderingContext2D.prototype;
if (CP.lineTo) {

    CP.dashedLine = CP.dashedLine || function (x, y, x2, y2, da, offset) {

        if (!da) da = [10, 5];
        if (!offset) offset = 0;

        if (CP.setLineDash && typeof (CP.lineDashOffset) == "number") {
            this.save();
            this.setLineDash(da);
            this.lineDashOffset = offset;

            this.moveTo(x, y);
            this.lineTo(x2, y2);

            this.restore();
            return;
        }


        this.save();
        var dx = (x2 - x),
            dy = (y2 - y);
        var len = Math.sqrt(dx * dx + dy * dy);
        var rot = Math.atan2(dy, dx);
        this.translate(x, y);
        this.moveTo(0, 0);
        this.rotate(rot);
        var dc = da.length;
        var di = 0;

        var patternLength = 0;
        for (var i = 0; i < dc; i++) {
            patternLength += da[i];
        }
        if (dc % 2 == 1) {
            patternLength *= 2;
        }

        offset = offset % patternLength;
        if (offset < 0) {
            offset += patternLength;
        }

        var startPos = 0;
        var startSegment = 0;
        while (offset >= startPos) {



            if (offset >= startPos + da[startSegment % dc]) {
                startPos += da[startSegment % dc];
                startSegment++;
            } else {
                offset = Math.abs(offset - startPos);
                break;
            }


            if (startSegment > 100) break;
        }
        draw = startSegment % 2 === 0;
        x = 0;
        di = startSegment;


        while (len > x) {
            var interval = da[di++ % dc];
            if (x < offset) {
                interval = Math.max(interval - offset, 1);
                offset = 0;
            }

            x += interval;
            if (x > len) x = len;
            draw ? this.lineTo(x, 0) : this.moveTo(x, 0);
            draw = !draw;
        }
        this.restore();
    };
}
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Looks like context.setLineDash is pretty much implemented. See this.

" context.setLineDash([5]) will result in a dashed line where both the dashes and spaces are 5 pixels in size. "

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