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I'm running a java application that is supposed to process a batch of files through some decisioning module. I need to process the batch for about 50 hrs. The problem I'm facing is that the process runs fine for about an hour and then starts to idle. So, I did this - I run the JVM for one hour and then shut it down, restart the JVM after 30 mins, but still for some reason the second run is taking almost 4-5 hrs. to do what the first run does in 1 hr. Any help or insights would be greatly appreciated.

I am running this on a 64-bit windows r2 server, 2 intel quad core processors(2.53 GHz), 24 GB RAM. Java version is 1.6.0_22(64-bit), memory allotted to the application is - heap(16 GB) and PermGen(2GB).

the external module is also running on a jvm and i am shutting that down too, but i have a feeling that it is holding on to memory even after shutdown. before i start the jvm RAM usage is 1 GB, after I end it it tends to stay at about 3 GB. Is there any way i can ask JAVA to forcibly release that memory?

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I think it's the OS which deals with freeing JVM memory. Have you checked file IO through put? Sometime it becomes idle or slow due to writing a large file. Is there any significant change in your hard disk space? What do you mean by external module? a naitve library? Do you use multithreading in your application? possibly thread lock? – gigadot Jan 2 '11 at 7:21

Are you sure the JVM you are trying to close is indeed closed?

Once a process ends all of the RAM it had allocated is no longer allocated. There's no way for a process to hang on to it once it closes, which also means there's no way for you to tell it to do so. This is done by the Operating System.

Frankly, this sounds like the JVM is still running, or something else is eating the RAM. Also, it sounds like you're trying to workaround a vicious bug instead of hunting it down and killing it?

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Yes the JVM is terminating very gracefully without any errors, feels to me like the external module is using native heap which is out of scope of the JVM. (The external module also runs on the same JVM). The reason why I say this is because the machine's RAM usage before starting the process is 1Gb and even a long time after stopping the JVM it stays at about 3 GB (usage when JVM runs is about 8GB). Is there anyway to free this resource without modifying the external module? – user560174 Jan 2 '11 at 16:44
    
There is no such thing as "native heap". A process's memory (be it a JVM or not) is always unallocated once it exits. How can you tell the JVM exited? How can you not know which process is consuming the memory? Have you looked in the Task Manager and checked which process is actually consuming the memory and whether the java.exe (or javaw.exe) process is not there? – abyx Jan 2 '11 at 18:06
    
yes when the jvm exits the task manager no longer has the java.exe or javaw.exe – user560174 Jan 2 '11 at 23:35
    
that's the surprising part, if i add up the memory usage from all processes (for all users) it is about 500-600MB, but performance tab shows 3 GB usage. – user560174 Jan 3 '11 at 18:29

I suspect the JVM isn't exiting at all. I see this symptom regularly with a JBoss instance that grinds to a halt with OutOfMemoryExceptions. When I kill the JVM (via a SIGTERM/SIGQUIT), the JVM doesn't exit in a timely fashion since it's consuming all its resources throwing/handling OOM exceptions.

Check your logs and process table carefully to ensure the JVM quits properly. At that point the OS will clear all resources related to that process (including the consumed memory)

share|improve this answer
    
Yes the JVM is terminating very gracefully without any errors, feels to me like the external module is using native heap which is out of scope of the JVM. (The external module also runs on the same JVM). The reason why I say this is because the machine's RAM usage before starting the process is 1Gb and even a long time after stopping the JVM it stays at about 3 GB (usage when JVM runs is about 8GB). Is there anyway to free this resource without modifying the external module? – user560174 Jan 2 '11 at 16:44

i've noticed something in the process.

After I shut down the JVM, if i delete all the files that i wrote to the file system, then the RAM usage comes back to the original 1 GB.

Does this lead to anything and can i possibly do something about it.

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If you delete files using method provided by OS, e.g. command line or gui, it should be OS bugs. This sounds so unlikely. Did you generate lots of files (billion) and forget to close files, e.g. close IO streams within your Java app or native library? – gigadot Jan 3 '11 at 7:10
    
i'm doing this for about a million files and I am closing them as well, can't understand why it is hanging on to the memory – user560174 Jan 3 '11 at 15:54

Out of interest: Have you tried splitting up the process so that it can run in parallel?

A 50hr job is a big job! You have a decent machine there (8 cores and 24GB Ram) and you should be able to parallelise some parts of it.

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it is a multithreaded process and there are 2 such processes running on it. – user560174 Jan 2 '11 at 23:07
    
also there are 4 such machines doing this thing but still i need to run it for 50 hrs – user560174 Jan 2 '11 at 23:07
    
After I shut down the JVM, if i delete all the files that i wrote to the file system, then the RAM usage comes back to the original 1 GB. Does this lead to anything and can i possibly do something about it. – user560174 Jan 2 '11 at 23:08
    
Are you sure you don't have dead lock using multithreading? – gigadot Jan 3 '11 at 7:11
    
i'm using executor service to handle the multi threading, so i'm hoping there aren't any deadlocks. Also all threads are performing all the assigned tasks. – user560174 Jan 3 '11 at 16:18

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