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I want to a shuffled merged list that will keep the internal order of the lists.

For example:

list A: 11 22 33

list B: 6 7 8

valid result: 11 22 6 33 7 8

invalid result: 22 11 7 6 33 8

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@Mitch What purpose does such a comment serve? Be nice! –  marcog Jan 2 '11 at 14:53
    
@marcog: I was being neither nice or nasty. –  Mitch Wheat Jan 2 '11 at 15:10

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Original Answer:

static IEnumerable<T> MergeShuffle<T>(IEnumerable<T> lista, IEnumerable<T> listb)
{
    var first = lista.GetEnumerator();
    var second = listb.GetEnumerator();

    var rand = new Random();
    bool exhaustedA = false;
    bool exhaustedB = false;
    while (!(exhaustedA && exhaustedB))
    {
        bool found = false;
        if (!exhaustedB && (exhaustedA || rand.Next(0, 2) == 0))
        {
             exhaustedB = !(found = second.MoveNext());
            if (found)
                yield return second.Current;
        }
        if (!found && !exhaustedA)
        {
            exhaustedA = !(found = first.MoveNext());
            if (found)
                yield return first.Current;
        }
    }                
}

Second answer based on marcog's answer

    static IEnumerable<T> MergeShuffle<T>(IEnumerable<T> lista, IEnumerable<T> listb)
    {
        int total = lista.Count() + listb.Count();
        var random = new Random();
        var indexes = Enumerable.Range(0, total-1)
                                .OrderBy(_=>random.NextDouble())
                                .Take(lista.Count())
                                .OrderBy(x=>x)
                                .ToList();

        var first = lista.GetEnumerator();
        var second = listb.GetEnumerator();

        for (int i = 0; i < total; i++)
            if (indexes.Contains(i))
            {
                first.MoveNext();
                yield return first.Current;
            }
            else
            {
                second.MoveNext();
                yield return second.Current;
            }
    }
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What is the advantage of the second answer? –  itamarb Jan 2 '11 at 10:51
    
Nothing just an alternative answer that uses linq –  Hasan Khan Jan 2 '11 at 12:20
    
The first answer isn't going to be randomly distributed. Consider a case where A has 1 values and B has 10. You're far more likely to place the value from A near the front of the list. –  marcog Jan 2 '11 at 14:52
    
Anything which is unpredictable qualifies as random. So it would be incorrect to say that 1st isn't random however your point is valid that it won't be 'as' random as the second one. –  Hasan Khan Jan 17 '11 at 16:18

Just randomly select a list (e.g. generate a random number between 0 and 1, if < 0.5 list A, otherwise list B) and then take the element from that list and add it to you new list. Repeat until you have no elements left in each list.

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Generate A.Length random integers in the interval [0, B.Length). Sort the random numbers, then iterate i from 0..A.Length adding A[i] to into position r[i]+i in B. The +i is because you're shifting the original values in B to the right as you insert values from A.

This will be as random as your RNG.

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Just iterate through both lists simultaneously randomly selecting which list to pick items from. Then stick them into another list. Here's one way to do it:

static IEnumerable<T> Shuffle<T>(IEnumerable<T> listB, IEnumerable<T> listA)
{
    var rng = new Random();
    var lists = new[] { new Queue<T>(listA), new Queue<T>(listB) };
    while (lists.Any(l => l.Any()))
    {
        int i = rng.Next(2);
        var selected = lists[i];
        if (!lists[i].Any())
            selected = lists[1-i];
        yield return selected.Dequeue();
    }
}
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