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i want to use korean translations under in my - quite large - wxwidgets application. The application uses the wxwidgets translation framework, which is based on gettext.

I have working translations for french, german and russian. I want to go unicode anyway, but my first question is:

  1. does my application need unicode support to display korean and japanese languages?

  2. If so, - just for interest - why does russian work without, since they have a cyrillic letterset?

  3. I have thousands of string literals. Do i have to prepend each and every one of them with 'L' ? ( wxString foo("foo") --> wxString foo(L"foo") )

  4. if so, did someone build a regex or sed or perl script to do this in ca. 500 .cpp files ? ( pleeze! =) )

  5. Will this change in wxWidgets 3.0?

  6. Unicode question general: i use these string literals in many descriptive and many technical ways .. as displayed text as well as parts of GLSL shaders as well as XML. These APIs have char* / const char* as function arguments, so my internal wxString representation should not matter in these areas. Theory and practice: is this true? Some experiences to share, anyone?

  7. I do some text processing ( comparing, string finding etc ) - are there any logical differences in unicode vs. ansi?

  8. Is there any remarkeable performance impact in using Unicode?

Thank you! Wendy

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Addressing some of your questions…

  • does my application need unicode support to display korean and japanese languages?
  • If so, - just for interest - why does russian work without, since they have a cyrillic letterset?

Russian fits in a single-byte charset, just like western European languages (though it is a different charset). Korean and Japanese (and Chinese) don't. There are many workarounds for this, but the most elegant I know of to date is to use Unicode so that you don't need to rebuild your application for each locale; just change its message catalog.

  • Unicode question general: i use these string literals in many descriptive and many technical ways .. as displayed text as well as parts of GLSL shaders as well as XML. These APIs have char* / const char* as function arguments, so my internal wxString representation should not matter in these areas. Theory and practice: is this true? Some experiences to share, anyone?

Only strings that are going to be shown to (non-technical) users need to be localized, so they're the only ones that have to be in Unicode. The most common approach is to use UTF-8 (which is a particular way of encoding Unicode) as that means that ASCII strings – the most common type passed around inside programs – are exactly the same, which simplifies things a lot. The down-side is that you no longer have cheap indexing into the string as not all characters are the same number of bytes long. That can be anything from a non-issue to a right royal hindering PITA, depending on what the program is doing.

  • I do some text processing ( comparing, string finding etc ) - are there any logical differences in unicode vs. ansi?

Comparisons work fine, as does simple string finding. Other operations (e.g., getting the 20th character of a string, or working out how many characters into a string you've found a substring) are nasty because you've not got constant character widths. The nastiness can be mitigated by using wide characters, but they're less nice to use for external data (they introduce potential problems with endianness unless you go into working with byte-order marks, and that's another matter right there).

  • Is there any remarkeable performance impact in using Unicode?

Depends on exactly what you do. With UTF-8, if you're mostly dealing with ASCII text in reality then you get very little in the way of performance problems for most operations. With wide characters, you take more memory for every character, which naturally has performance implications (but which might acceptable because it does mean you've got constant-time indexing).

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  1. There's a korean .po file on http://www.wxwidgets.org/about/i18n.php for wxWidget's own strings. If your application displays wxWidget's own strings correctly when using that file, then it does not need Unicode support to display Korean and Japanese languages.
  2. ISO-8859-5 is an 8 bit character set with Cyrillic letters.
  3. Only if 1. does not yield the correct result. But if you want to translate the string, you should have used _().
  4. I don't know.
  5. wxWidgets 3.0 will not have separate Unicode- and ANSI-builds. 2.9.1 doesn't have, either.
  6. It depends on how you use the arguments. C- and C++-functions usually operate on the representation of strings and are unaware of any particular character encoding. Particularly what you perceive to be a character and what the program considers a character might be different things.
  7. See 6.
  8. I do not know, but many toolkits use UTF-16 or UTF-32 instead of UTF-8 because these schemes are simpler. It's a size-speed tradeoff.
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regarding point 3: wxstring initialized with string literals do not compile without 'L' in unicode mode –  wendy_44 Jan 2 '11 at 22:29
    
@wendy_44 That's correct. On the other hand, wxString initialized with 'L' string literals do not compile in ANSI mode. Now before you try a unicode build, test what I suggested in 1. to see if a unicode build is needed at all (I suspect it is not). If you want a unicode built after all, use _() for literal strings that should be translated and wxT() for literal strings that should not be translated. These two macros ensure that both a unicode built as well as an ansi built will succeed. –  Oswald Jan 2 '11 at 23:13
    
Answer to 5: ( docs.wxwidgets.org/trunk/… ) For example, the notorious (due to the confusion they created) macros wxT() and _T() are not needed at all any longer. Basically, you can remove them from any code which used them. –  wendy_44 Jan 3 '11 at 12:47

1.does my application need unicode support to display korean and japanese languages?

Thanks to Oswald, i found out that you can have a korean translation without using unicode in your wxwidgets application. Change ( under windows, at least ) settings for non-unicode aware programs. But i still have to check out if this is enough for a whole application.

3.I have thousands of string literals. Do i have to prepend each and every one of them with 'L' ? ( wxString foo("foo") --> wxString foo(L"foo") )

If you have to use unicode with wxwidgets prior to 3.0, you have to. But do not use 'L' under wxwidgets, use wxT("foo")

4.if so, did someone build a regex or sed or perl script to do this in ca. 500 .cpp files ?

I did, at least a search and replace under Visual Studio:

Search: {"([^"]*)"}
Replace: wxT(\1)

But be careful! Will replace all string literals, #include "file.h" with #include wxT("file.h")

  1. Will this change in wxWidgets 3.0?

Yes. See answer/quote above.

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