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The main reason why I want it is that I want to extend my initialize function.

Something like this:

// main.js

window.onload = init();
function init(){
     doSomething();
}

// extend.js

function extends init(){
    doSomethingHereToo();
}

So I want to extend a function like I extend a class in PHP.

And I would like to extend it from other files too, so for example I have the original init function in main.js and the extended function in extended.js.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 46 down vote accepted

With a wider view of what you're actually trying to do and the context in which you're doing it, I'm sure we could give you a better answer than the literal answer to your question.

But here's a literal answer:

If you're assigning these functions to some property somewhere, you can wrap the original function and put your replacement on the property instead:

// Original code in main.js
var theProperty = init;

function init(){
     doSomething();
}

// Extending it by replacing and wrapping, in extended.js
theProperty = (function(old) {
    function extendsInit() {
        old();
        doSomething();
    }

    return extendsInit;
})(theProperty);

If your functions aren't already on an object, you'd probably want to put them there to facilitate the above. For instance:

// In main.js
var MyLibrary = (function() {
    var publicSymbols = {};

    publicSymbols.init = init;
    function init() {
    }

    return publicSymbols;
})();

// In extended.js
(function() {
    var oldInit = MyLibrary.init;
    MyLibrary.init = extendedInit;
    function extendedInit() {
        oldInit.apply(MyLibrary); // Use #apply in case `init` uses `this`
        doSomething();
    }
})();

But there are such better ways to do that. Like for instance, providing a means of registering init functions.

// In main.js
var MyLibrary = (function() {
    var publicSymbols = {},
        initfunctions = [];

    publicSymbols.init = init;
    function init() {
        var funcs = initFunctions;

        initFunctions = undefined;

        for (index = 0; index < funcs.length; ++index) {
            try { funcs[index](); } catch (e) { }
        }
    }

    publicSymbols.addInitFunction = addInitFunction;
    function addInitFunction(f) {
        if (initFunctions) {
            // Init hasn't run yet, rememeber it
            initFunctions.push(f);
        }
        else {
            // `init` has already run, call it almost immediately
            // but *asynchronously* (so the caller never sees the
            // call synchronously)
            setTimeout(f, 0);
        }
    }

    return publicSymbols;
})();

(Much of the above could be written a bit more compactly, but I wanted to use clear names like publicSymbols rather than my usual pubs or anonymous object literal. You can write it a lot more compactly if you want to have anonymous functions, but I don't much care for anonymous functions.)

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Thanks for a great answer. My problem with the second example is that I might need the result from the function that I am extending. –  G. Davids Nov 22 '13 at 10:31

There are several ways to go about this, it depends what your purpose is, if you just want to execute the function as well and in the same context, you can use .apply():

function init(){
  doSomething();
}
function myFunc(){
  init.apply(this, arguments);
  doSomethingHereToo();
}

If you want to replace it with a newer init, it'd look like this:

function init(){
  doSomething();
}
//anytime later
var old_init = init;
init = function() {
  old_init.apply(this, arguments);
  doSomethingHereToo();
};
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Sometimes you may want the .call method instead of .apply. See this StackOverflow question. –  MrDanA Jun 11 at 17:10

The other methods are great but they don't preserve any prototype functions attached to init. To get around that you can do the following (inspired by the post from Nick Craver).

(function () {
    var old_prototype = init.prototype;
    var old_init = init;
    init = function () {
        old_init.apply(this, arguments);
        // Do something extra
    };
    init.prototype = old_prototype;
}) ();
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Use extendFunction.js

init = extendFunction(init, function(args) {
  doSomethingHereToo();
});

But in your specific case, it's easier to extend the global onload function:

extendFunction('onload', function(args) {
  doSomethingHereToo();
});

I actually really like your question, it's making me think about different use cases.

For javascript events, you really want to add and remove handlers - but for extendFunction, how could you later remove functionality? I could easily add a .revert method to extended functions, so init = init.revert() would return the original function. Obviously this could lead to some pretty bad code, but perhaps it lets you get something done without touching a foreign part of the codebase.

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