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I was randomly testing std::thread in my virtual linux machine (GCC 4.4.5-Debian) with this test program:

#include <algorithm>
#include <thread>
#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <functional>
using namespace std;

static int i=0;
void f( vector<int> &test)
{
    ++i;
    cout << "Push back called" << endl;
    test.push_back(i);
}

int main()
{
    vector<thread> t;
    vector<int> test;
    for( int i=0; i<1000; ++i )
    {
        t.push_back( thread( bind(f, test) ) );
    }
    for( auto it = t.begin(); it != t.end(); ++it )
    {
        (*it).join();
    }
    cout << test.size() << endl;
    for( auto it = test.begin(); it != test.end(); ++it )
    {
        cout << *it << endl;
    }

    return 0;
}

Why does vector test remain empty? Am I doing something stupid with references (probably) or is it something with bind or some threading problem?

Thanks!

UPDATE: with the combined help of Kos and villintehaspan I "fixed" the "problem":

#include <algorithm>
#include <thread>
#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <functional>
using namespace std;

static int i=0;
void f( vector<int> &test)
{
    ++i;
    test.push_back(i);
}

int main()
{
    vector<thread> t;
    vector<int> test;
    for( int i=0; i<1000; ++i )
    {
        t.push_back( thread(f, std::ref(test)) );
    }
    for( auto it = t.begin(); it != t.end(); ++it )
    {
        (*it).join();
    }
    cout << test.size() << endl;
    for( auto it = test.begin(); it != test.end(); ++it )
    {
        cout << *it << endl;
    }

    return 0;
}

Which prints all values in order and seems to work OK. Now only one question remains: is this just lucky (aka undefined behavior (TM) ) or is the static variable causing a silent mutex-like step in the code?

PS: I understand the "killing multithreadedness" problem here, and that's not my point. I'm just trying to test the robustness of the basic std::thread functionality...

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Looks to me like a threading problem.

While I'm not 100% sure, it should be noted that all 1000 threads:

  • do ++i on the same int value (it's not an atomic operation- you may encounter problems here, you can use __sync_fetch_and_add(&i,1) instead (note that it's a gcc extension not standard C++);

  • do push_back simultaneously on a std::vector, which is not a thread-safe container AFAIK... Same for cout I think. I believe you'd need to use a locking mechanism around that (std::mutex perhaps? I've only used pthreads so far but I believe it's what you need).

Note that this kind of kills any benefit of using threads here, but that's a consequence of the fact that you shouldn't use multiple threads at once on a non-thread-safe object.


----EDIT----

I had a google on this threading API (not present on my tdm gcc 4.5 on Windows, unfortunately). Aparrently instead of:

thread( bind(f, test) )

you can just say

thread( f, test )

and pass an arbitrary number of arguments in this way.

Source: http://www.informit.com/guides/content.aspx?g=cplusplus&seqNum=422

This should also solve your problem with making a copy of the vector which I haven't noticed before (+1 for @villintehaspam here).


Actually, one more thing is needed to make sure the copy isn't created here:

thread( f, std::ref(test) )

will make sure that the vector isn't copied.

Wow, I got confused too. :)

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You are correct that the poster should prevent multithreaded access to the variables. It is the bind that is the problem here, but I'm voting +1 since this will be a problem after the bind is fixed. –  villintehaspam Jan 2 '11 at 13:25
1  
Well, it seems that the thread(f, test) call uses something like bind internally, because I get the vector copy behavior here too. (also: too bad std::thread isn't available for mingw... the mingw-w64 project is working on it, but it's not done yet :( ) –  rubenvb Jan 2 '11 at 13:30
    
Helpful, thanks a lot! –  Tianyi Dec 28 '12 at 12:49

The bind will actually make a copy of the vector, so that each thread push_back's on their own copy (yes, that & won't help here). You need to provide the threads with a pointer or similar so that they use the same vector. You should also make sure to use access protection like suggested by Kos.

Edit: After your fix to use std::ref instead of making a copy of the vector, the multithreaded access problem still remains. My guess is that the only reason you don't get any problems right now is because the example is so trivial (or maybe you've only tried in debug mode) - there is no automatic guarantee that the ++ is atomic just because the int is static.

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Does boost::bind also behave in this way by default? Is there a syntax to make std::bind pass the vector by reference, as the OP would expect? –  Kos Jan 2 '11 at 13:27
1  
std::bind(f, std::ref(test)) perhaps? Just a wild guess :) –  Kos Jan 2 '11 at 13:28
    
std::ref does the trick! –  rubenvb Jan 2 '11 at 13:31
    
What's wrong with a good lambda? –  Puppy Jan 2 '11 at 13:38
    
@DeadMG: 1) GCC 4.4 doesn't support them and 2) don't know the mightily confusing syntax :D + the fact that the std::thread constructor seems to alleviate the need for std::bind. –  rubenvb Jan 2 '11 at 13:39

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