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I need to pass a parameter (POST) to a @managedBean, I used managed properties like this:

@ManagedProperty(value = "#{param.id}")
private int id;

And the scope of the Bean is ViewScope

I end up with this error:

Unable to create managed bean receipt. The following problems were found: - The scope of the object referenced by expression #{param.id}, request, is shorter than the referring managed beans scope of view

What can I do?

arjan take a look:

My page: Facelet Title

<form method="post" action="faces/index.xhtml">
  <input name="id" value="4" />
  <input type="submit" value="submit" />
</form>

<h:form>
  <h:commandLink value="click" action="index">
    <f:param id="id" name="id" value="20"/>
  </h:commandLink>
</h:form>

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2 Answers

up vote 16 down vote accepted

Two ways:

  1. Make the bean request scoped and inject the view scoped one as another @ManagedProperty.

    @ManagedBean
    @RequestScoped
    public class RequestBean {
        @ManagedProperty(value="#{param.id}")
        private Integer id;
        @ManagedProperty(value="#{viewBean}")
        private ViewBean viewBean;
    }
    

    The view scoped bean is available during @PostConstruct and action methods of request scoped bean. You only need to keep in mind that the id can get lost when you do a postback to the same view without the parameter.

  2. Or, grab it manually from the request parameter map during bean's construction.

    @ManagedBean
    @ViewScoped
    public class ViewBean {
        private Integer id;
        public ViewBean() {
            id = Integer.valueOf(FacesContext.getCurrentInstance().getExternalContext().getRequestParameterMap().get("id"));       
        }
    }
    

    This way the initial id is available during the entire view scope.

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Thanks, is the first solution (injecting the viewScoped bean in the requestScoped one) a good and popular practice??? –  ehsun7b Jan 2 '11 at 18:35
    
My app is being served by GlassFish and I can use CDI beans too, but I decided to do some project using the JSF beans cause I'm very new in JSF, is it a good idea? –  ehsun7b Jan 2 '11 at 18:38
1  
Depends on the purpose of the id. Do you want to "refresh" it on every request? Go for way 1. Or do you want to use the initial value during the entire view scope? Go for way 2. –  BalusC Jan 2 '11 at 18:48
    
Thanks, very complete description. –  ehsun7b Jan 2 '11 at 19:42
    
Would you please read the other answer which was post on my question and give me your idea? –  ehsun7b Jan 2 '11 at 20:02
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As an alternative to grabbing the parameters directly from the request in your bean, you can use view parameters.

These need to be declared on the Facelet where you use your managed bean as follows:

<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml"
    xmlns:h="http://java.sun.com/jsf/html"
    xmlns:f="http://java.sun.com/jsf/core"
>
    <h:body>

    <f:metadata>
        <f:viewParam id="id" name="id" value="#{myBean.id}" />        
    </f:metadata>

    <!-- Rest of Facelet here -->   

    </h:body>
</html>

If you now request this page, the setter of the backing bean will be called with the request value provided for the id parameter. This works for both GET and (non-faces) POST requests.

The advantage is that you can use the standard JSF converters and validators here. Of course if your managed bean is not tied to a particular view then this solution is less ideal.

A small peculiar thing to watch out for is that when doing a normal faces postback after the initial request that provided the view parameter, the setter in your bean will be called again, even if the bean is in view scope and no new value is explicitly provided.

To test that this works, I've used the following managed bean:

import javax.annotation.PostConstruct;
import javax.faces.bean.ManagedBean;
import javax.faces.bean.ViewScoped;
import javax.faces.event.ActionEvent;

@ManagedBean
@ViewScoped
public class MyBean {

    Long id;

    @PostConstruct
    public void test() {
        System.out.println("post construct called");
    }

    public void actionMethod(ActionEvent event) {       
        System.out.println("action called");        
    }

    public Long getId() {
        return id;
    }

    public void setId(Long id) {
        this.id = id;
    }

}

And the following Facelet:

<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml"
    xmlns:h="http://java.sun.com/jsf/html"
    xmlns:f="http://java.sun.com/jsf/core"
>
    <h:body>

        <f:metadata>
            <f:viewParam id="id" name="id" value="#{myBean.id}" />        
        </f:metadata>

        <h:outputText value="#{myBean.id}"/>

        <h:form>
            <h:commandButton value="test" actionListener="#{myBean.actionMethod}"/>
        </h:form>

        <form method="post">
            <input name="id" value="4" />
            <input type="submit" value="submit" />
        </form>

    </h:body>
</html>

Enter a number in the input field and click the submit button. If the number is printed back on the screen the test has succeeded. Note that the second form is a regular form and does not post any JSF state along. I tested this on JBoss AS 6 and it works. Proving the id parameter as a GET parameter also works.

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Oh I imagined this only works for GET! thanks man! –  ehsun7b Jan 2 '11 at 19:44
    
I does not work for me :( –  ehsun7b Jan 2 '11 at 19:52
    
As far as I find in the books and tutorials they only work for Get parameters, are you sure that they can be used with Post parameters????... –  ehsun7b Jan 2 '11 at 20:01
1  
Uhm, although I'm no authoritative source on this I'm pretty sure I have used this before with POST parameters. I'll check it again and update my answer. –  Arjan Tijms Jan 2 '11 at 20:03
    
I tested again and updated my answer. It's just two files so it should be easy for you to copy. –  Arjan Tijms Jan 2 '11 at 20:18
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