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class B { /* ... */ };

class A {
public:
    A() { obj = NULL; }
private:
    static B* obj;
};

However this produces huge mass of linker errors that symbol obj is unresolved.

What's the "correct" way to have such private static class member without these linker errors?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You need to define like this :

this is in the header :

class B { ... }

class A {
public:
    A() { obj = NULL; }
private:
    static B* obj;
}

this is in the source

B* A::obj = NULL;
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7  
Most probably he doesn't need A() { obj = NULL; } then –  Roman L Jan 2 '11 at 18:36
2  
@7vies: Not including the A constructor would change the meaning of the code. Currently the construction of a new A object resets the static member obj (which may be important). –  Loki Astari Jan 2 '11 at 19:40
1  
@Martin: While I agree that taking the initialization of the static member out of the constructor changes the behavior, I am curious why someone would open themselves up to the potential memory leaks this could (and likely would) cause. If any A object creates a B object on the heap, the next time an A object is created, the B object will be leaked. –  Zac Howland Jan 3 '11 at 20:44

You need to add

B *A::obj = NULL;

to one of your cpp files. Also note that if you set obj in A's constructor, that means that whenever you create an A object you reset obj again - since it is static, there is only one obj that is shared among all A instances.

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http://www.parashift.com/c++-faq/ctors.html#faq-10.12

(And as @peoro noted, please remember to end every class definition with a ;).

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missing ; is a compile error not a link one –  Roman L Jan 2 '11 at 18:35
1  
+1 for link to the FAQ –  Stuart Golodetz Jan 2 '11 at 18:36
    
@7vies: That's why that part is a parenthesized PS. –  aschepler Jan 2 '11 at 18:36
    
well, even in parentheses it does not make much sense as he already knows that –  Roman L Jan 2 '11 at 18:39

You have to initialize obj in a cpp file:

B* A::obj = NULL;

You are not allowed to initialize it in a constructor, since it is a static variable.

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As it happens, he's assigning to it rather than trying to initialise it in the constructor, which is why he gets linker rather than compiler errors. –  Stuart Golodetz Jan 2 '11 at 18:38

You declared the static member, but you did not define it.

Further, you set its value whenever any instance of A is constructed, whereas in fact you only want it initialised once.

class B;

class A {
private:
    static B* obj;
};

B* A::obj = NULL;

As your class A definition is probably in a header file, you should ensure that the definition of obj (that I added) goes in one (and one only) .cpp file. This is because it must appear only once in your compiled project, but the contents of the header file may be #included multiple times.

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Linking errors are because you also need to declare static variables outside class definition purely for linking purpose and static memory allocation as

B* A::obj;
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