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I'd like something that has the same effect as this:

>>> path = "/foo/bar/baz/file"
>>> path_split = path.rsplit('/')[1:]
>>> path_split
['foo', 'bar', 'baz', 'file']

But that will work with Windows paths too. I know that there is an os.path.split() but that doesn't do what I want, and I didn't see anything that does.

share|improve this question
    
BTW Python has os.path that assumes your current OS path syntax but there are also OS-specific path modules called posixpath, ntpath, macpath and os2emxpath with the same interface. –  Kos Jan 3 at 15:13

7 Answers 7

up vote 18 down vote accepted

The OP specified "will work with Windows paths too". There are a few wrinkles with Windows paths.

Firstly, Windows has the concept of multiple drives, each with its own current working directory, and 'c:foo' and 'c:\\foo' are often not the same. Consequently it is a very good idea to separate out any drive designator first, using os.path.splitdrive(). Then reassembling the path (if required) can be done correctly by drive + os.path.join(*other_pieces)

Secondly, Windows paths can contain slashes or backslashes or a mixture. Consequently, using os.sep when parsing an unnormalised path is not useful.

More generally:

The results produced for 'foo' and 'foo/' should not be identical.

The loop termination condition seems to be best expressed as "os.path.split() treated its input as unsplittable".

Here's a suggested solution, with tests, including a comparison with @Spacedman's solution

import os.path

def os_path_split_asunder(path, debug=False):
    parts = []
    while True:
        newpath, tail = os.path.split(path)
        if debug: print repr(path), (newpath, tail)
        if newpath == path:
            assert not tail
            if path: parts.append(path)
            break
        parts.append(tail)
        path = newpath
    parts.reverse()
    return parts

def spacedman_parts(path):
    components = [] 
    while True:
        (path,tail) = os.path.split(path)
        if tail == "":
            components.reverse()
            return components
        components.append(tail)

if __name__ == "__main__":
    tests = [
        '',
        'foo',
        'foo/',
        'foo\\',
        '/foo',
        '\\foo',
        'foo/bar',
        '/',
        'c:',
        'c:/',
        'c:foo',
        'c:/foo',
        'c:/users/john/foo.txt',
        '/users/john/foo.txt',
        'foo/bar/baz/loop',
        'foo/bar/baz/',
        '//hostname/foo/bar.txt',
        ]
    for i, test in enumerate(tests):
        print "\nTest %d: %r" % (i, test)
        drive, path = os.path.splitdrive(test)
        print 'drive, path', repr(drive), repr(path)
        a = os_path_split_asunder(path)
        b = spacedman_parts(path)
        print "a ... %r" % a
        print "b ... %r" % b
        print a == b

and here's the output (Python 2.7.1, Windows 7 Pro):

Test 0: ''
drive, path '' ''
a ... []
b ... []
True

Test 1: 'foo'
drive, path '' 'foo'
a ... ['foo']
b ... ['foo']
True

Test 2: 'foo/'
drive, path '' 'foo/'
a ... ['foo', '']
b ... []
False

Test 3: 'foo\\'
drive, path '' 'foo\\'
a ... ['foo', '']
b ... []
False

Test 4: '/foo'
drive, path '' '/foo'
a ... ['/', 'foo']
b ... ['foo']
False

Test 5: '\\foo'
drive, path '' '\\foo'
a ... ['\\', 'foo']
b ... ['foo']
False

Test 6: 'foo/bar'
drive, path '' 'foo/bar'
a ... ['foo', 'bar']
b ... ['foo', 'bar']
True

Test 7: '/'
drive, path '' '/'
a ... ['/']
b ... []
False

Test 8: 'c:'
drive, path 'c:' ''
a ... []
b ... []
True

Test 9: 'c:/'
drive, path 'c:' '/'
a ... ['/']
b ... []
False

Test 10: 'c:foo'
drive, path 'c:' 'foo'
a ... ['foo']
b ... ['foo']
True

Test 11: 'c:/foo'
drive, path 'c:' '/foo'
a ... ['/', 'foo']
b ... ['foo']
False

Test 12: 'c:/users/john/foo.txt'
drive, path 'c:' '/users/john/foo.txt'
a ... ['/', 'users', 'john', 'foo.txt']
b ... ['users', 'john', 'foo.txt']
False

Test 13: '/users/john/foo.txt'
drive, path '' '/users/john/foo.txt'
a ... ['/', 'users', 'john', 'foo.txt']
b ... ['users', 'john', 'foo.txt']
False

Test 14: 'foo/bar/baz/loop'
drive, path '' 'foo/bar/baz/loop'
a ... ['foo', 'bar', 'baz', 'loop']
b ... ['foo', 'bar', 'baz', 'loop']
True

Test 15: 'foo/bar/baz/'
drive, path '' 'foo/bar/baz/'
a ... ['foo', 'bar', 'baz', '']
b ... []
False

Test 16: '//hostname/foo/bar.txt'
drive, path '' '//hostname/foo/bar.txt'
a ... ['//', 'hostname', 'foo', 'bar.txt']
b ... ['hostname', 'foo', 'bar.txt']
False
share|improve this answer

Someone said "use os.path.split". This got deleted unfortunately, but it is the right answer.

os.path.split(path)

Split the pathname path into a pair, (head, tail) where tail is the last pathname component and head is everything leading up to that. The tail part will never contain a slash; if path ends in a slash, tail will be empty. If there is no slash in path, head will be empty. If path is empty, both head and tail are empty. Trailing slashes are stripped from head unless it is the root (one or more slashes only). In all cases, join(head, tail) returns a path to the same location as path (but the strings may differ).

So it's not just splitting the dirname and filename. You can apply it several times to get the full path in a portable and correct way.

Please credit the original author if that answer gets undeleted.

share|improve this answer
2  
+1: Just using the proper library functions the right way is really the best solution. –  lunaryorn Jan 2 '11 at 19:09
    
@lunaryorn: Not necessarily the best; this is O(n^2), after all. It's not likely to matter for path-length strings, though. –  Glenn Maynard Jan 2 '11 at 19:17
    
Why is this solution O(n^2)? Sorry, if the answer is obvious, but I'm not getting it. "os.split()" likely just traverses the given path from the right side up to the last occurrence of a path separator. So even if the function itself is applied multiple times, the overall complexity should just be O(n) as well (with n being the length of the initial path). –  lunaryorn Jan 2 '11 at 19:29
1  
Easier said than done. Show your code. –  John Machin Jan 2 '11 at 23:06

Use the functionality provided in os.path, e.g.

os.path.split(path)

Like written elsewhere you can call it multiple times to split longer paths.

share|improve this answer
    
Please read my question. os.path.split() just splits it into a pair in the form (dir, basename)—not what I want. –  Aaron Yodaiken Jan 2 '11 at 18:56
    
I'm sorry for not getting what you said. If you want, edit your question so I can upvote you. –  Aaron Yodaiken Jan 2 '11 at 21:17

Use the functionality provided in os.path, e.g.

os.path.split(path)

(This answer was by someone else and was mysteriously and incorrectly deleted, since it's a working answer; if you want to split each part of the path apart, you can call it multiple times, and each call will pull a component off of the end.)

share|improve this answer
2  
Easier said than done. Show your code. –  John Machin Jan 2 '11 at 23:05
    
He asked how to do it, and I told him how. I'm not going to hold his hand for such a simple thing. –  Glenn Maynard Jan 2 '11 at 23:09

One more try with maxplit option, which is a replacement for os.path.split()

def pathsplit(pathstr, maxsplit=1):
    """split relative path into list"""
    path = [pathstr]
    while True:
        oldpath = path[:]
        path[:1] = list(os.path.split(path[0]))
        if path[0] == '':
            path = path[1:]
        elif path[1] == '':
            path = path[:1] + path[2:]
        if path == oldpath:
            return path
        if maxsplit is not None and len(path) > maxsplit:
            return path
share|improve this answer

Here's an explicit implementation of the approach that just iteratively uses os.path.split; uses a slightly different loop termination condition than the accepted answer.

def splitpath(path):
    parts=[]
    (path, tail)=os.path.split( path)
    while path and tail:
         parts.append( tail)
         (path,tail)=os.path.split(path)
    parts.append( os.path.join(path,tail) )
    return map( os.path.normpath, parts)[::-1]

This should satisfy os.path.join( *splitpath(path) ) is path in the sense that they both indicate the same file/directory.

Tested in linux:

In [51]: current='/home/dave/src/python'

In [52]: splitpath(current)
Out[52]: ['/', 'home', 'dave', 'src', 'python'] 

In [53]: splitpath(current[1:])
Out[53]: ['.', 'dave', 'src', 'python']

In [54]: splitpath( os.path.join(current, 'module.py'))
Out[54]: ['/', 'home', 'dave', 'src', 'python', 'module.py']

In [55]: splitpath( os.path.join(current[1:], 'module.py'))
Out[55]: ['.', 'dave', 'src', 'python', 'module.py']

I hand checked a few of the DOS paths, using the by replacing os.path with ntpath module, look OK to me, but I'm not too familiar with the ins and outs of DOS paths.

share|improve this answer

So keep using os.path.split until you get to what you want. Here's an ugly implementation using an infinite loop:

import os.path
def parts(path):
    components = [] 
    while True:
        (path,tail) = os.path.split(path)
        if tail == "":
            components.reverse()
            return components
        components.append(tail)

Stick that in parts.py, import parts, and voila:

>>> parts.parts("foo/bar/baz/loop")
['foo', 'bar', 'baz', 'loop']

Probably a nicer implementation using generators or recursion out there...

share|improve this answer
1  
how about the_path.split(os.path.sep)? just saying… –  hop Jan 2 '11 at 22:07
2  
@aharon: -1 Multiple problems, see my answer. –  John Machin Jan 2 '11 at 22:49
    
@hop: as already commented elsewhere, Windows paths can MIX slashes and backslashes. –  John Machin Jan 2 '11 at 22:52
    
-1 this does not work. See @john-machin answer for solution –  jterrace Apr 16 '12 at 18:08

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