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I had to split an int "123456" each value of it to an Int[] and i have already a Solution but i dont know is there any better way : My solution was :

public static int[] intToArray(int num){
    String holder = num.ToString();
    int[] numbers = new int[Holder.ToString().Length]; 
    for(int i=0;i<numbers.length;i++){
        numbers[i] = Convert.toInt32(holder.CharAt(i));
    }
    return numbers;
}
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Check my answer pal, it's the easiest way if you heard about LINQ –  Jani Jan 2 '11 at 20:30
    
@Hans Passant ,i'm pretty sure about the Array Length because the Longest Number i`ll have can be 999996 so 6 is the Highest Length of an array ,and also Performance is not an issue because of that Number Limitation . –  Burimi Jan 4 '11 at 9:42
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8 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I believe this will be better than converting back and forth. As opposed to JBSnorro´s answer I reverse after converting to an array and therefore avoid IEnumerable´s which I think will contribute to a little bit faster code. This method work for non negative numbers, so 0 will return new int[1] { 0 }.

If it should work for negative numbers, you could do a n = Math.Abs(n) but I don't think that makes sense.

Furthermore, if it should be more performant, I could create the final array to begin with by making a binary-search like combination of if-statements to determine the number of digits.

public static int[] digitArr(int n)
{
    if (n == 0) return new int[1] { 0 };

    var digits = new List<int>();

    for (; n != 0; n /= 10)
        digits.Add(n % 10);

    var arr = digits.ToArray();
    Array.Reverse(arr);
    return arr;
}
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I had thought about whether I wanted to create an array first, or reverse the list first. But I thought, why not do them at the same time(using the IEnumerable extension methods). I realise this is only a micro-optimalization, since the list won't be long. The other (more important) argument I came up with was elegance. –  JBSnorro Jan 2 '11 at 20:45
    
I think your points are perfectly valid :) I just wanted Burim Shala to know why I did as I did and why I think it is better. I see you have updated your answer which is nice :) –  Lasse Espeholt Jan 2 '11 at 21:25
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A simple solution by LINQ

 int[] result = yourInt.ToString().Select(o=> Convert.ToInt32(o)).ToArray()
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+1 It's interesting to note this approach is just the nice side-effect free implementation of the code in the post: many common imperative operations over homogeneous lists have trivial and clean "functional" counter-parts. –  user166390 Jan 2 '11 at 21:43
    
However, edge-cases (say, -12) should still be taken into account -- even if it's just a documented restriction on the functions domain. The original post does not itself make this restriction. –  user166390 Jan 2 '11 at 21:50
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int[] outarry = Array.ConvertAll(num.ToString().ToArray(), x=>(int)x);

but if you want to convert it to 1,2,3,4,5:

int[] outarry = Array.ConvertAll(num.ToString().ToArray(), x=>(int)x - 48);
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There's no ToCharArray on int. The input is int not string –  Rune FS Jan 2 '11 at 21:18
    
@Rune FS, What? holder is string, I get it from OPs sample. –  Saeed Amiri Jan 2 '11 at 21:27
    
Couldn't see from your answer that is was only a part of the solution that's what confused me –  Rune FS Jan 3 '11 at 7:22
    
@Rune FS, yes, if you didn't read question carefully it's not obvious. I'd edited to make it independent of question. –  Saeed Amiri Jan 3 '11 at 7:38
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You can do that without converting it to a string and back:

public static int[] intToArray(int num) {
  List<int> numbers = new List<int>();
  do {
    numbers.Insert(0, num % 10);
    num /= 10;
  } while (num > 0);
  return numbers.ToArray();
}

It only works for positive values, of course, but your original code also have that limitation.

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Using conversion from int to string and back probably isn't that fast. I would use the following

public static int[] ToDigitArray(int i)
{
    List<int> result = new List<int>();
    while (i != 0)
    {
        result.Add(i % 10);
        i /= 10;
    }
    return result.Reverse().ToArray();
}

I do have to note that this only works for strictly positive integers.

EDIT:

I came up with an alternative. If performance really is an issue, this will probably be faster, although you can only be sure by checking it yourself for your specific usage and application.

public static int[] ToDigitArray(int n)
{
    int[] result = new int[GetDigitArrayLength(n)];
    for (int i = 0; i < result.Length; i++)
    {
        result[result.Length - i - 1] = n % 10;
        n /= 10;
    }
    return result;
}
private static int GetDigitArrayLength(int n)
{
    if (n == 0)
        return 1;
    return 1 + (int)Math.Log10(n);
}

This works when n is nonnegative.

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1  
It doesn't work for zero either, it returns an empty array instead of an array with one digit. –  Guffa Jan 2 '11 at 20:25
    
@Guffa, I already said that. I said it only works for positive integers, and zero isn't positive. In fact I said it works for Strictly positive integers only, so with the word "strictly" I explicitly stated that case i = 0 doesn't work. –  JBSnorro Jan 2 '11 at 20:27
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I'd do it like this:

    var result = new List<int>();
    while (num != 0) {
        result.Insert(0, num % 10);
        num = num / 10;
    }
    return result.ToArray();

Slightly less performant but possibly more elegant is:

    return num.ToString.Select(c => Convert.ToInt32(c.ToString())).ToArray();

Note that these both return 1,2,3,4,5,6 rather than 49,50,51,52,53,54 (i.e. the byte codes for the characters '1','2','3','4','5','6') as your code does. I assume this is the actual intent?

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string DecimalToBase(int iDec, int numbase)
        {
            string strBin = "";
            int[] result = new int[32];
            int MaxBit = 32;
            for(; iDec > 0; iDec/=numbase)
            {
                int rem = iDec % numbase;
                    result[--MaxBit] = rem;
            } 
            for (int i=0;i<result.Length;i++)
                if ((int)result.GetValue(i) >= base10)
                    strBin += cHexa[(int)result.GetValue(i)%base10];
                else
                    strBin += result.GetValue(i);
            strBin = strBin.TrimStart(new char[] {'0'});
            return strBin;
        }
        int BaseToDecimal(string sBase, int numbase)
        {
            int dec = 0;
            int b;
            int iProduct=1;
            string sHexa = "";
            if (numbase > base10)
                for (int i=0;i<cHexa.Length;i++)
                    sHexa += cHexa.GetValue(i).ToString();
            for(int i=sBase.Length-1; i>=0; i--,iProduct *= numbase)
            {
                string sValue = sBase[i].ToString();
                if (sValue.IndexOfAny(cHexa) >=0)
                    b=iHexaNumeric[sHexa.IndexOf(sBase[i])];
                else 
                    b= (int) sBase[i] - asciiDiff;
                dec += (b * iProduct);
            } 
            return dec; 
        }
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1  
Could you explain that code, so someone might know how it is an answer to the question posed? –  Andrew Barber Sep 21 '12 at 18:38
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i had similar requirement .. i took from many good ideas, and added a couple missing pieces .. where many folks weren’t handling zero or negative values. this is what i came up with:

    public static int[] DigitsFromInteger(int n)
    {
        int _n = Math.Abs(n);
        int length = ((int)Math.Log10(_n > 0 ? _n : 1)) + 1;
        int[] digits = new int[length];
        for (int i = 0; i < length; i++)
        {
            digits[(length - i) - 1] = _n % 10 * ((i == (length - 1) && n < 0) ? -1 : 1);
            _n /= 10;
        }
        return digits;
    }

i think this is pretty clean .. although, it is true we're doing a conditional check and several extraneous calculations with each iteration .. while i think they’re nominal in this case, you could optimize a step further this way:

    public static int[] DigitsFromInteger(int n)
    {
        int _n = Math.Abs(n);
        int length = ((int)Math.Log10(_n > 0 ? _n : 1)) + 1;
        int[] digits = new int[length];
        for (int i = 0; i < length; i++)
        {
            //digits[(length - i) - 1] = _n % 10 * ((i == (length - 1) && n < 0) ? -1 : 1);
            digits[(length - i) - 1] = _n % 10;
            _n /= 10;
        }
        if (n < 0)
            digits[0] *= -1;
        return digits;
    }
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