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Say I have some windows method and a struct:

struct SomeStruct{
int foo;
int bar;
int baz;
int bat;
}

SomeMethod(int a,int wParam, int lParam)
{
   SomeStruct s;

   // get lParam into SomeStruct
}

How to I get the lParam into a SomeStruct variable? I'm thinking that I need something like this (but feel free to point out my ignorance):

SomeMethod(int a, int wParam, int lParam)
{
  SomeStruct *s; //declare struct variable
  s = lParam;    //assign integer value as pointer to struct
  printf("the value of s.foo is %d", s.foo);  //print result
}
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Is there a specific method you are working with? I think your answer will work for most, but some methods are different. –  user4891 Jan 19 '09 at 16:11

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Yes, assuming that lParam 'really' contains a pointer to the struct, then you get at it by 'casting':

  SomeStruct* s; //declare pointer-to-struct variable
  s = (SomeStruct*) lParam;    //assign integer value as pointer to struct
  printf("the value of s->foo is %d", s->foo);  //print result
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Just be ware that it's up to you to make sure it is what you say it is. –  Eclipse Jan 19 '09 at 16:15
    
Yeah, it's supposed to be a pointer to that type struct. thanks –  scottm Jan 19 '09 at 16:16
    
That won't work if integers are smaller than pointers. –  dreamlax Jan 19 '09 at 20:40
    
Integers aren't smaller than pointers because he tagged it "Win32", not "Win64"; in any case, lParam ought to be a LONG, not an INT (perhaps he oversimplified it somehow in his OP). –  ChrisW Jan 21 '09 at 16:52
    
LParam is in fact an LPARAM, i.e. a LONG_PTR, and thus big enough for a SomeStruct* –  MSalters Jan 23 '09 at 12:57

lParam and wParam are usually names for variables of the WPARAM and LPARAM types respectively. WPARAM and LPARAM types of variables are used to declare parameters in SendMessage, PostMessage, WindowProc,DefWindowProc - MS Windows API as well as in the message handlers (frequently but inappropriately called event handlers). Historicaly, in 16-bit versions of windows, WPARAM was defined as WORD (16-bit) value and LPARAM was defined as LONG; that explains names. Both parameters are uses as untyped cookies, that carry some information in a message, either value or the address of the entity containing more information that is processed by a message handler. In 16-bit world, WPARAM was used to carry near address and LPARAM used to carry far address. WPARAM and LPARAM are types now defined as 32-bit values. In SDKs (Software Developer Kit) in WinDef.h. WPARAM is defined as UINT in earlier versions of SDK and now as UINT_PTR. LPARAM stays defined as LONG in earlier versions of SDK and now as LONG_PTR

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Just be careful when you cast integers to pointers. On x64 architectures, int remains a 32-bit integer, but pointers are 64-bit.

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Please use the correct types, or your code will fail on Win64.

SomeMethod(int a, WPARAM wParam, LPARAM lParam)
{
  SomeStruct *s = (SomeStruct *) lParam;
  printf("the value of s.foo is %d", s.foo);  //print result
}
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Sorry, but It's a huge mistake to try to convert integers into pointers. To use an undefined type pointer, just use the void pointer. Instead of:



struct SomeStruct {
    int foo;
    int bar;
    int baz;
    int bat;
}

SomeMethod(int a, int wParam, int lParam)
{
    SomeStruct *s; //declare struct variable
    s = lParam;    //assign integer value as pointer to struct
    printf("the value of s.foo is %d", s.foo);  //print result
}

You might use:



struct SomeStruct {
    int foo;
    int bar;
    int baz;
    int bat;
}

SomeMethod(int a, int wParam, void *lParam)
{
    struct SomeStruct *s; //declare struct variable
    s = (struct SomeStruct *)lParam; //assign integer value as pointer to struct
    printf("the value of s.foo is %d", s->foo); //print result
}

Where also a concrete pointer to the structure may work:



SomeMethod(int a, int wParam, struct SomeStruct *lParam)
{
    printf("the value of s.foo is %d", lParam->foo);  //print result
}

Try reading some tip about C, like C-FAQ.

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1  
...but in some situations in Windows programming, you need to use an LPARAM. –  reuben Feb 1 '09 at 22:01

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