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I have multiple html elements. They use very similar css styles. Only difference is border style (one element has all but left border, another all but right etc).

So far, i used to create several different styles which have only one line of code different. That seriously bloated my css file. Is there any better solution to my problem? Is there any kind of inheritance that i could use?

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5 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

There is many ways to achieve that.

  1. Use multiple selectors:

    selector #1, selector #2, selector #3 {
        /* common styles */
    }
    selector #1 { border-left: none; }
    selector #2 { border-right: none; }
    selector #3 { border-top: none; }
    
  2. Depending on document structure you can try something like this:

    <ul>
       <li>Element #1</li>
       <li>Element #2</li>
       <li>Element #3</li>
    </ul>
    
    
    ul li {
        /* common styles */
    }
    ul li:first-child { border-left: none; }
    ul li:last-child { border-right: none; }
    
  3. Use multiple classes:

    <ul>
       <li class="border no-left">Element #1</li>
       <li class="border">Element #2</li>
       <li class="border no-right">Element #3</li>
    </ul>
    
    
    .border {
        /* common styles */
    }
    .border.no-left { border-left: none; }
    .border.no-right { border-right: none; }
    
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Nice one, thank you! But what when i have something like this: input[type=button]:hover similar to something like this: input[type=button] ??? –  johan Jan 3 '11 at 3:13
    
@johan That's the first case in the answer above: use commas to separate multiple, arbitrarily-complex selectors and assign them to the same style. Note that I believe that this is only appropriate when there is a semantic relationship between the selected elements. (Or if you are desperate to save a few bytes.) –  Phrogz Jan 3 '11 at 3:32
    
:hover pseudoclass can be interpreted as " extra styles for indicated element", so input[type=button] { common-styles } input[type=button]:hover { specific-styles } –  Crozin Jan 3 '11 at 8:25
    
-1 there are errors in the code, also if someone is asking this question, best to not introduce pseudo-elements to a noob :\ Also, I've seen inconsistent results with double-class CSS .x.y –  Kirk Strobeck Jan 5 '11 at 21:43
    
What errors? I didn't tested that code, but at a glance I can't find any. "pseudo-elements"... you mean "xxx:xxx-child"? What's wrong about them? .x.y selector is well supported. Only old and dead IE6 had some troubles in some specific cases with that. –  Crozin Jan 6 '11 at 12:32
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Just came across this. Appreciate it was a while back, so suspect that is why it was not mentioned before, but I think the best solution now would be to use SASS to define your CSS. You were def on the right lines in wanting inheritance, and SASS will allow that. Here is a link to find out more about SASS.

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In this particular scenario - where you have elements with different border styles - you can use the :first-child pseudo-class.

Live demo: http://jsfiddle.net/7WJe9/1/

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CSS

.border {
    border: solid #555 2px;
    width: 100px;
    height: 100px;
    }
    .border.left {
        border-width: 0 2px 0 0;
        }
    .border.right {
        border-width: 0 0 0 2px;
        }

HTML

<div class="border left"></div>
<div class="border"></div>
<div class="border right"></div>
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You can declare an element with several classes

<div class="general-class left-border-class"></div>
<div class="general-class top-border-class"></div>
...
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