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If you have a for loop like this:

for(j = 0; j<=90; j++){}

It works fine. But when you have a for loop like this:

for(j = 0; j<=90; j+3){}

it doesn't work. Could someone please explain this to me?

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5  
+1 for trying something out yourself first before asking here. –  Falmarri Jan 3 '11 at 3:06
    
The side-effect of j++ is? The side-effect of j+3 is? –  user166390 Jan 3 '11 at 3:55

6 Answers 6

That’s because j+3 doesn’t change the value of j. You need to replace that with j = j + 3 or j += 3 so that the value of j is increased by 3:

for (j = 0; j <= 90; j += 3) { }
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Alternately he could int j=0; for(;j<=90;){... j+=3;} but that's nonobvious ;) –  jcolebrand Jan 3 '11 at 2:57
5  
@drachenstern In other words, a while loop. –  dkarp Jan 3 '11 at 3:15
    
@dkarp ~ Indeed, but seeing as how most people don't think about that syntax, thought I would point it out. Especially since the OP is obviously learning Java and programming at a young age (check the profee and the linked blog). I wish I had had SO at that age. –  jcolebrand Jan 3 '11 at 3:17

Since nobody else has actually tackled Could someone please explain this to me? I believe I will:

j++ is shorthand, it's not an actual operation (ok it really IS, but bear with me for the explanation)

j++ is really equal to the operation j = j + 1; except it's not a macro or something that does inline replacement. There are a lot of discussions on here about the operations of i+++++i and what that means (because it could be intepreted as i++ + ++i OR (i++)++ + i

Which brings us to: i++ versus ++i. They are called the post-increment and pre-increment operators. Can you guess why they are so named? The important part is how they're used in assignments. For instance, you could do: j=i++; or j=++i; We shall now do an example experiment:

// declare them all with the same value, for clarity and debug flow purposes ;)
int i = 0;
int j = 0;
int k = 0;

// yes we could have already set the value to 5 before, but I chose not to.
i = 5;

j = i++;
k = ++i;

print(i, j, k); 
//pretend this command prints them out nicely 
//to the console screen or something, it's an example

What are the values of i, j, and k?

I'll give you the answers and let you work it out ;)

i = 7, j = 5, k = 7; That's the power of the pre and post increment operators, and the hazards of using them wrong. But here's the alternate way of writing that same order of operations:

// declare them all with the same value, for clarity and debug flow purposes ;)
int i = 0;
int j = 0;
int k = 0;

// yes we could have already set the value to 5 before, but I chose not to.
i = 5;

j = i;
i = i + 1; //post-increment

i = i + 1; //pre-increment
k = i;

print(i, j, k); 
//pretend this command prints them out nicely 
//to the console screen or something, it's an example

Ok, now that I've shown you how the ++ operator works, let's examine why it doesn't work for j+3 ... Remember how I called it a "shorthand" earlier? That's just it, see the second example, because that's effectively what the compiler does before using the command (it's more complicated than that, but that's not for first explanations). So you'll see that the "expanded shorthand" has i = AND i + 1 which is all that your request has.

This goes back to math. A function is defined where f(x) = mx + b or an equation y = mx + b so what do we call mx + b ... it's certainly not a function or equation. At most it is an expression. Which is all j+3 is, an expression. An expression without assignment does us no good, but it does take up CPU time (assuming the compiler doesn't optimize it out).


I hope that clarifies things for you and gives you some room to ask new questions. Cheers!

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I'll also add "Congratulations on being [14|15] and asking clear questions about language fundamentals instead of just wanking off doing zilch" and I have some other concepts for you to consider once you have grasped the basics of this if you like. –  jcolebrand Jan 3 '11 at 2:54
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neat, TY, @jcolebrand. –  Syntactic Sugar May 14 '13 at 20:32

In your example, j+=3 increments by 3. (Not much else to say here, if it's syntax related I'd suggest Googling first, but I'm new here so I could be wrong.)

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1  
You're right, but the original question has j+3 which doesn't actually increment j. The OP should use j += 3. –  Greg Hewgill Jan 3 '11 at 2:39

for(j = 0; j<=90; j = j+3){}

j+3 will not assign the new value to j, add j=j+3 will assign the new value to j and the loop will move up by 3.

j++ is like saying j = j+1, so in that case your assigning the new value to j just like the one above

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+1 - Good explanation of the concepts. –  jmort253 Jan 3 '11 at 2:39

Change for(j = 0; j<=90; j+3) to for(j = 0; j<=90; j=j+3)

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The "increment" portion of a loop statement has to change the value of the index variable to have any effect. The longhand form of "++j" is "j = j + 1". So, as other answers have said, the correct form of your increment is "j = j + 3", which doesn't have as terse a shorthand as incrementing by one. "j + 3", as you know by now, doesn't actually change j; it's an expression whose evaluation has no effect.

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