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How can I display an alert after a user clicks a submit button in a form?

I want the alert to show when the page has loaded after the submit button has been clicked.

Is there any way to do this?

EDIT:

I need the message to be HTML text that is displayed on the page--not a javascript alert.

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@codedude - the alert is a JavaScript alert ? or just a HTML displaying some plain-text message? –  ajreal Jan 3 '11 at 2:37
    
What does the alert contain? Any info from the form? Is the form submitting back to the same page or a different page? –  jmort253 Jan 3 '11 at 2:38
    
The alert will just be plain old html text. The form submits back to the same page. –  codedude Jan 3 '11 at 2:39
    
You'd probably want to call that a "confirmation page", rather than an alert. –  Hippo Jan 3 '11 at 2:49
    
well, its not its own page, just the previous page but with some html text showing the user the form submiited sucessfully. –  codedude Jan 3 '11 at 2:53

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

pagewithform.php

<html>
  <head>
  ...
  </head>
  <body>
    ...
    <form action="myformsubmit.php" method="POST">
      <label>Name: <input type="text" name="name" /><label>
      <input type="Submit" value="Submit" />
    </form>
    ...
  </body>
</html>

myformsubmit.php

<html>
  <head>
  ....
  </head>
  <body>
    <?php if (count($_POST)>0) echo '<div id="form-submit-alert">Form Submitted!</div>'; ?>
    ...
  </body>
</html>

EDITED Fits new critieria of OP on last edit.

EDITv2 Try it at home!

<html>
  <head>
    <title>Notify on Submit</title>
  </head>
  <body>
    <form action="<?php echo $_SERVER['PHP_SELF']; ?>" method="POST">
      <label>Name: <input type="text" name="name" /></label>
      <input type="submit" value="Submit" />
    </form>
    <?php if (count($_POST)>0) echo "Form Submitted!"; ?>
  </body>
</html>

Try that on for size.

share|improve this answer
    
(See Edited post) –  codedude Jan 3 '11 at 2:40
    
@codedude: Noted, now see my edited post. ;-) –  Brad Christie Jan 3 '11 at 2:41
    
Are you sure this will work? –  Jefffrey Jan 3 '11 at 2:42
    
Did you try it? –  John Conde Jan 3 '11 at 2:44
    
@CharliePigarelli: Well, ultimately the count($_POST) is a Very broad assumption on my part, but without any additional information from the OP it's the best bet I can make. Also included the "source" page's form to show the demo. –  Brad Christie Jan 3 '11 at 2:45

Since you're submitting back to the same page, a cleaner and more modern way of doing this would be to use JQuery to submit the form using AJAX. You can then specify a callback method that will update a container on the page to reflect the change in state:

$('#myForm').submit(function() {
   $('#myResultDiv').text("Form submitted");
   return false;
});


... 

<div id="myResultDiv"></div>

This prevents the unnecessary reloading of the page, making your web application snappier and more responsive.

This also has the added benefit of keeping your HTML and JavaScript (content and behavior) separate, for which your web designers will thank you for.

This would work with just about any server-side platform, including but not limited to PHP.

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I would be using Ajax if I had a good understanding of how it worked. Right now I have basically null. –  codedude Jan 3 '11 at 2:54
    
This is actually one of the more simple examples. When your user presses submit, the form data is sent to your PHP script just as it normally would be, except the user continues to see the same page. When the form is done processing, the anonymous function bound to "submit" is called, and the text "Form submitted" is inserted into the DIV with the id="myResultDiv". In my opinion, depending how much time you have as well as patience, it's worth investigating as it will improve the usability of your app. Of course, there are plenty of other solutions here that will probably be easier for you –  jmort253 Jan 3 '11 at 3:03
    
It should be noted that AJAX should still be considered a supplement and not an alternative. It's still modern practice to do things with page transitions and, when possible/supported, make them seamless with AJAX calls. –  Brad Christie Jan 3 '11 at 3:05
    
I don't think it makes sense to use page transitions when the page you're transitioning to is in fact the same page. That's a lot of unnecessary bandwidth and time to make a round trip back to the server, IMHO. –  jmort253 Jan 3 '11 at 3:06
    
@jmort253: I agree, but just like we carried on the "What about text-only-browsers" support torche for so many years, some still don't have JS or disable it completely. (NoScript specifically comes to mind with people being paranoid about malware/viruses/etc.) –  Brad Christie Jan 3 '11 at 3:09
<?php

echo "<html>
<head>
</head>";

if($_POST['submit']){
     echo 'The form was submitted!";
} else {
    echo '<form action="'.$_SERVER['PHP_SELF'].'" method="POST"><input type="submit" name="submit" value="Submit">';
}

echo "</html>";

?>
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