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Okay, I'm hating Javascript right now, and I hope someone can help me.

I have code which is set up like the following:

function Obj1() {
    var me = this;

    this.something = "yay";

    this.getThis = function(){
        return me;
    }
}

Obj1.prototype.method = function() {
    return this.something;
};

function Obj2() {
    this.something = "nay";

}
Obj2.prototype.method = function() {
    return this.something;
}; 



var o1 = new Obj1();
var o2 = new Obj2();

document.write(o1.method()); // Returns yay
document.write(o1.method.call(o2));   // Returns nay, but I need "yay" here

(JSFiddle @ http://jsfiddle.net/A9u9K/)

My Problem is, that I need to call Obj1.method in the second case, but I am absolutely unable to get a reference to the object :(

How can I work around this?

Edit: Sorry, I got my example code pretty wrong :( Updated it. I took most of the code from a previous answer, because it is much nicer and still illustrates my problem.

share|improve this question
    
The code is doing what you've asked it to do. You are asking the javascript engine to call the method method() in Obj1() with the scope obj2. If you want just to call method() in Obj1 then you can stop at obj1.method as in your case 1. This is how javascript engine works with object scope so if you call a method in one object with scope as another object then the this keyword in the called method will point to the scoped object. –  Arun P Johny Jan 3 '11 at 7:54
    
Yep, my problem was, that I had some code which did "o1.method.call(o2)", but in that method I needed a reference to o1 to do stuff. Anyhow, I solved my problem by reading the links from T.J. Crowder (thank you so much :D) –  fresskoma Jan 3 '11 at 8:08

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Updated Answer:

document.write(o1.method.call(o2)); // Returns nay, but I need "yay" here

You've said you've got it sorted now, but as the answer to that isn't actually shown here on SO, I figured I may as well update to show it.

If it's method you want to have access me, even if it's been called with a different this value, you have to define it like getThis, as a closure over me:

function Obj1() {
    var me = this;

    this.something = "yay";

    this.method = function() {
        return me.something;
    };

    this.getThis = function(){
        return me;
    };
}

function Obj2() {
    this.something = "nay";

}
Obj2.prototype.method = function() {
    return this.something;
};

...or of course, if you don't need the "something" to be a property on the object, just make it a var within the constructor (a private variable, like me):

function Obj1() {
    var me = this;
    var something = "yay";

    this.method = function() {
        return something;
    };

    this.getThis = function(){
        return me;
    };
}

function Obj2() {
    this.something = "nay";

}
Obj2.prototype.method = function() {
    return this.something;
};

Original Answer: (To Revision 1 of the question, which didn't have me.)

but I thought that, when creating a closure (as I do in 4) Javascript should preserve "this".

this is set entirely by how a function is called, not where it's defined; more about that here and here. But the way you've defined your getThis function, you can use the fact it closes over the constructor call to solve this (no pun) without using this:

function Obj1() {
    var me = this;               // <== Use a variable to remember `this`

    this.something = "yay";

    this.method = function() {
        return this.something;
    };

    this.getThis = function(){
        return me;               // <== Return it
    };
}

Live example

More about closures and the plumbing that makes the me thing work here.

There is a cost involved in this, and just generally in your pattern of defining functions within the constructor function: Each individual object created by Obj1 and Obj2 gets its own copy of each function. This can have memory implications if there are lots of these objects running around (but unless you have lots, you needn't worry and you get benefits like the me thing and other private variables). In constrast, if you use a function assigned to the prototype, all instances will share a single, common copy of the function.

In your sample code, only the getThis function really needs to be duplicated for every instance (because you're relying on the closure), so you can do this to avoid unnecessary function proliferation:

function Obj1() {
    var me = this;

    this.something = "yay";

    this.getThis = function(){
        return me;
    };
}
Obj1.prototype.method = function() {
    return this.something;
};

function Obj2() {
    this.something = "nay";

}
Obj2.prototype.method = function() {
    return this.something;
};
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, i would rewrite the code (in the question) this way too :) –  fenderplayer Jan 3 '11 at 7:18
    
I updated my example code to illustrate my problem better (using your code snippet). In my code (as well as in yours) I can't really call the getThis method at all, when "this" is overwritten, which makes it pointless. I screwed up my previous example code, sorry for that. –  fresskoma Jan 3 '11 at 7:46
    
@x3ro: So the problem's sorted now? (From your comment on the question.) Good deal if so, glad that helped. –  T.J. Crowder Jan 3 '11 at 8:40

The issue is with the reference changing for the this object with scope. Instead if using a this directly in closure use a local variable equated to this, i.e, change your Obj1 toL

function Obj1() {
    this.something = "yay";
        var that = this;

    this.method = function() {
        return that.something;
    }

    this.getThis = function(){
        return that;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

The only way to solve this is to another place holder to hold the value of this in Obj1 and use it in the function method() and getThis().

function Obj1() {
    var instance = this;

    this.something = "yay";

    this.method = function() {
        return instance.something;
    }

    this.getThis = function(){
        return instance;
    }
}

But what I cannot under stand is why you are doing it(obj1.getThis.call(obj2).method())? This explicitly says that you want to change the scope of the method getThis() to something else, then you are trying to solve the problem which was created by this usage.

Can you tell why you want something like this?

share|improve this answer
    
Actually, when I was writing my example, I got something wrong. I agree with you that it doesn't make any sense at all... I'm going to edited my question... –  fresskoma Jan 3 '11 at 7:37

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