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I've got a collection of object which contains data as follows:

FromTime                    Duration

2010-12-28                  24.0000

2010-12-29                  24.0000

2010-12-30                  24.0000

2010-12-31                  22.0000

2011-01-02                  1.9167

2011-01-03                  24.0000

2011-01-04                  24.0000

2011-01-05                  24.0000

2011-01-06                  24.0000

2011-01-07                  22.0000

2011-01-09                  1.9167

2011-01-10                  24.0000

In the "FromTime" column, there are data "gaps" i.e. 2011-01-01 and 2011-01-08 are "missing". So what I'd like to do is to loop through a range of dates (in this instance 2010-12-28 to 2011-01-10) and "fill in" the "missing" data with a duration of 0.

As I've just started with LINQ, I feel that it should be "fairly" easy but I can't quite get it right. I'm reading the book "LINQ in Action" but feel that I'm still quite a way off before I can resolve this particular issue. So any help would be much appreciated.

David

share|improve this question
    
Why litter the dataset with empty entries? –  leppie Jan 3 '11 at 8:33
    
Well unfortunaly I have to because I'm binding this data to a third party Silverlight component which requires me to do so in order for the graph generated to look decent. –  DavidS Jan 3 '11 at 8:37
    
Should the time component taken into consideration? For example you already have 2011-01-02 22:00:00.000 in the collection. Should 2011-01-02 00:00:00.000 be considered missing? –  Darin Dimitrov Jan 3 '11 at 8:40
    
No the time component is not important. I'll clean up the OP to simplify the question. –  DavidS Jan 3 '11 at 8:43
    
@DavidS: Fair point, but sure you can just inject the empty entries before databinding. I do not see any place for them in a database. –  leppie Jan 3 '11 at 9:11

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I'll define class like bellow:

public class DurDate
{
    public DateTime date = DateTime.ToDay;
    public decimal dure = 0;
}

and will wrote function like bellow:

private IEnumerable<DurDate> GetAllDates(IEnumerable<DurDate> lstDur)
    {

        var min = lstDur.Min(x => x.date).Date;
        var max = lstDur.Max(x => x.date).Date;
        var nonexistenceDates = Enumerable.Range(0, (int) max.Subtract(min).TotalDays)
            .Where(x =>!lstDur.Any(p => p.date.Date == min.Date.AddDays(x)))
            .Select(p => new DurDate {date = min.Date.AddDays(p), dure = 0});

        return lstDur.Concat(nonexistenceDates).OrderBy(x=>x.date);
    }

Sample test case:

List<DurDate> lstDur = new List<DurDate> { new DurDate { date = DateTime.Today, dure = 10 }, new DurDate { date = DateTime.Today.AddDays(-5), dure = 12 } };

Edit: It works simply, first I'll going to find min and max range:

var min = lstDur.Min(x => x.date).Date;
var max = lstDur.Max(x => x.date).Date;

What are the days not in the given range:

Where(x =>!lstDur.Any(p => p.date.Date == min.Date.AddDays(x)))

After finding this days, I'll going to select them:

Select(p => new DurDate {date = min.Date.AddDays(p), dure = 0})

At last concatenate the initial values to this list (and sort them):

lstDur.Concat(nonexistenceDates).OrderBy(x=>x.date);
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Saeed. Your code worked and your explanation of what the code did was very clear specially for a LINQ beginner like myself. –  DavidS Jan 3 '11 at 9:31
    
Sorry about not upvoting but I've done it now. :). Btw any advice beyond what's already available on SO on what the best resources for learning LINQ are in your opinion? –  DavidS Jan 3 '11 at 9:49
    
@DavidS, msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/vcsharp/aa336746 is good for startup, after that if you wanna improve your skills you should read some books like amazon.com/Professional-LINQ-Programmer-Scott-Klein/dp/… –  Saeed Amiri Jan 3 '11 at 10:18
    
Thanks for the advice –  DavidS Jan 4 '11 at 7:29

Something like that. I didn't tested it, but I believe, that you will got the idea:

    var data = new[]
               {
                   new  { Date = DateTime.Now.AddDays(-5), Duration = 3.56 },
                   new  { Date = DateTime.Now.AddDays(-3), Duration = 3.436 },
                   new  { Date = DateTime.Now.AddDays(-1), Duration = 1.56 },
               };

    Func<DateTime, DateTime, IEnumerable<DateTime>> range = (DateTime from, DateTime to) =>
                {
                    List<DateTime> dates = new List<DateTime>();
                    from = from.Date;
                    to = to.Date;
                    while (from <= to)
                    {
                        dates.Add(from);
                        from = from.AddDays(1);
                    }
                    return dates;
                };

    var result = range(data.Min(e => e.Date.Date), data.Max(e => e.Date.Date))
        .Join(data, e => e.Date.Date, e => e.Date, (d, x) => new {
                                                                     Date = d,
                                                                     Duration = x == null
                                                                         ? 0.0
                                                                         : x.Duration
                                                                 });

Also it would be better to replace this range lambda with some static method.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for taking the time to read the question and providing an answer. The code worked but Saeed's answer was easier for me to understand and that's why I selected his answer ahead of yours. –  DavidS Jan 3 '11 at 9:33

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