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What is the best way to represent one-to-one object association in C++? It should be as automatic and transparent as possible meaning, that when one end is set or reset, the other end will be updated. Probably a pointer-like interface would be ideal:

template<typename AssociatedType>
class OneToOne{
    void Associate(AssociatedType &);
    AssociatedType &operator* ();
    AssociatedType *operator->();
} 

Is there any better way to do it or is there any complete implementation?

EDIT:

Desired behavior:

struct A{
    void Associate(struct B &);
    B &GetAssociated();
};

struct B{
    void Associate(A &);
    A &GetAssociated();
};

A a, a2;
B b;

a.Associate(b);
// now b.GetAssociated() should return reference to a

b.Associate(a2);
// now b.GetAssociated() should return reference to a2 and 
// a2.GetAssociated() should return reference to b
// a.GetAssociated() should signal an error
share|improve this question
1  
One-to-one associations are a very broad kind of connection between types, objects, etc. If you tell us specifically what your goal is, we can give you a better idea as to what you should do. – Jonathan Grynspan Jan 3 '11 at 12:52
    
I need one object to point to the second and the second to point to the first. Then for example when I change the pointed to object in the first object to a third object, the second and third objects' associations will be updated automatically. – Juraj Blaho Jan 3 '11 at 12:58
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Untested, but you could use a simple decorator

template <typename A1, typename A2>
class Association
{
public:
  void associate(A2& ref)
  {
    if (_ref && &(*_ref) == &ref) return; // no need to do anything
    // update the references
    if (_ref) _ref->reset_association();
    // save this side
    _ref = ref;
    ref.associate(static_cast<A1&>(*this));
  }

  void reset_association() { _ref = boost::none_t(); }

  boost::optional<A2&> get_association() { return _ref; }

private:
  boost::optional<A2&> _ref;
};

now:

struct B;

struct A : public Association<A, B> {
};

struct B : public Association<B, A> {
};

now these operations should be handled correctly.

A a, a2;
B b;

a.associate(b);
b.associate(a2);

NOTES: I use boost::optional to hold a reference rather than pointer, there is nothing stopping you from using pointers directly. The construct you are after I don't think exists by default in C++, which is why you need something like the above to get it to work...

share|improve this answer

Here is one class that can represent a bi-directional one-to-one relation:

template <class A, class B>
class OneToOne {
  OneToOne<A,B>* a;
  OneToOne<A,B>* b;
protected:
  OneToOne(A* self) : a(self), b(0) {}
  OneToOne(B* self) : a(0), b(self) {}

public:
  void associateWith(OneToOne<A,B>& other) {
    breakAssociation();
    other.breakAssociation();

    if (a == this) {
      if (b != &other) {
        breakAssociation();
        other.associateWith(*this);
        b = &other;
      }
    }
    else if (b == this) {
      if (a != &other) {
        breakAssociation();
        other.associateWith(*this);
        a = &other;
      }
    }
  }

  A* getAssociatedObject(B* self) { return static_cast<A*>(a); }
  B* getAssociatedObject(A* self) { return static_cast<B*>(b); }

  void breakAssociation() {
    if (a == this) {
      if (b != 0) {
        OneToOne<A,B>* temp = b;
        b = 0;
        temp->breakAssociation();
      }
    }
    else if (b == this) {
      if (a != 0) {
        OneToOne<A,B>* temp = a;
        a = 0;
        temp->breakAssociation();
      }
    }
  }

private:
  OneToOne(const OneToOne&); // =delete;
  OneToOne& operator=(const OneToOne&); // =delete;
};
share|improve this answer

Perhaps check out boost::bimap, a bidirectional maps library for C++.

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