Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following code:

void testme(Object a) {
  # printing the type of the variable transferred to the function  
}

how can I know the type of the variable that passed to that function? for example how can I know the difference if the user executed the function as the following:

Integer a=5;
testme(a);

or

String a="a";
testme(a);

in general i'm building a generic functions to work with my database, and I need to use setLong/setInt/setString depends on which type of variable transfered to the function.

any ideas?

thanks

share|improve this question
    
getClass() method –  GregS Jan 3 '11 at 13:21
add comment

5 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can use instanceof and/or getClass. The former tests against a specific class, the latter actually gives you the Class object (String.class, etc.) for the argument. So for instance:

if (a instanceof String) {
    // ...
}
else if (a instanceof Integer) {
    // ...
}
// ...

But for your specific case, you may be able to use one of the versions of PreparedStatement#setObject.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks a lot! :) I did not notice that I can just use setObject on a preparedStatement. –  ufk Jan 3 '11 at 13:28
    
+1 for setObject. it is implemented with instanceof anyway. –  Bozho Jan 3 '11 at 13:29
    
@ufk: No worries, just make sure it does what you expect with the various types you're feeding in, your JDBC connector, and your backend database. The docs suggest there may be the odd dragon lurking, though I seem to recall having used it (some time ago now) to good effect. –  T.J. Crowder Jan 3 '11 at 13:30
    
already tested and it works flawlessly. –  ufk Jan 3 '11 at 13:40
    
@ufk: Excellent! Glad that helped. –  T.J. Crowder Jan 3 '11 at 14:21
add comment

If you're end goal is to operate with the database it's best NOT to use Object on your function like this. It doesn't tell anyone what is legal to pass. I'd suggest using JDBC setObject(int parameterIndex, Object x, int targetSqlType) instead, and have the caller identify the JDBC Type to you:

 public void someFunction( Object obj, int targetSqlType ) {
    statement.setObject( nextIndex, obj, targetSqlType );
 }

What you are doing with instanceof or getClass() is typically a bad practice. You're loosing vital type information by using Object then turning around and hard coding that type information in an if ladder. It's better to define multiple methods for each type all named the same thing. So if you have someFunction that can take 5 different parameter type you'd do the following:

  public void someFunction( Integer value ) {
       statement.setInt( convertThisValue( value ) );
  }

  public void someFunction( Long value ) {
       statement.setLong( convertThisValue( value ) );
  }

  public void someFunction( String value ) {
     ...
  }

  public void someFunction( Boolean value ) {
     ...
  }

  public void someFunction( Double value ) {
     ...
  }

  private <T extends Number> T convertThisValue( T value ) {
     // do some shared logic on processing the value
  }

In this example I've shown how you can easily define all the types you understand as separate methods differing only by type, and how you might centralize some conversion logic in a generic function (convertThisValue()) so you can share some processing between multiple types. What's better about this approach is you're using the Java complier to handle the work for you matching up the right method with the type the caller passed to it. No need for an if ladder, and the compiler will complain to the user when they aren't using a known type as oppose to using Object and having it die at runtime.

In JDBC the known types are well defined so you can easily create methods that know how to handle each type understood by every JDBC database. Also using the setObject() method makes your job much easier.

share|improve this answer
add comment
  • object.getClass() returns the class of the object. You can use equals or isAssignableFrom(..) to make reflective comparisons.
  • you can use the instanceof operator to make static comparisons: if (object instanceof String) {..}

While they are fine in your case, you should avoid using these in the general case. If you know in advance what will be the types that are passed, overload the methods: foo(Integer i) and foo(String s). If you don't know, you can use polymorphism and double-dispatch. Just make your objects implement a common interface:

interface Testable {
   void invokeTest();
}

class FooTest implements Testable {
    public void invokeTest() { // code specific for FooTest }
}

class BarTest implements Testable {
    public void invokeTest() { // code specific for BarTest }
}

And then:

public void test(Testable testable) {
    test.invokeTest();
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

if (a instanceof Integer) or if (a instanceof String)

share|improve this answer
add comment

Use the instanceof keyword

if(something instanceof String)
{
}
else if(something instanceof YourType)
{
}
share|improve this answer
    
not in Java. :) –  Bozho Jan 3 '11 at 13:24
1  
@Bozho why not? That works just fine and you write so yourself –  Sean Patrick Floyd Jan 3 '11 at 13:28
1  
@Sean Patrick Floyd the answer initially used something is String. not instanceof –  Bozho Jan 3 '11 at 13:30
    
@Bozho ah, the quick-edit-isn't-displayed phenomenon :-) –  Sean Patrick Floyd Jan 3 '11 at 13:31
    
Yeah sorry, I was in C# mode and only realised as I went back to eclipse –  James Jan 3 '11 at 13:41
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.