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I have multiple classes that have similar implementation for different named methods:

class MyClassX
{
   public int MyClassXIntMethod(){}
   public string MyClassXStringMethod(){}
}

class MyClassY
{
   public int MyClassYIntMethod(){}
   public string MyClassYStringMethod(){}
}

the methods inside the classes have similar implementation but because the method's names are different (due to 3rd party constraints) i cannot use inheritance.

I'm looking for an elegant solution that would be better than implementing the same functionality over and over again.

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migrated from programmers.stackexchange.com Jan 3 '11 at 14:09

This question came from our site for professional programmers interested in conceptual questions about software development.

3  
I think this belongs on stackoverflow.com . It's about best practices and not very subjective –  Sean Patrick Floyd Jan 3 '11 at 10:46
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4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

The classic answer IMHO is use the adpater pattern for every 3rd party calling party. Don't apply blindly but see if it is a good fit first.

class MyClassXAdapter
{
   IMyInterface _myImpClass

   public int MyClassXIntMethod(){ return _myImpClass.IntMethod()}
   public string MyClassXStringMethod(){ return _myImpClass.StringMethod() }
}

class MyClassYAdapter
{
   IMyInterface _myImpClass

   public int MyClassYIntMethod(){ return _myImpClass.IntMethod()}
   public string MyClassYStringMethod(){ _myImpClass.StringMethod() }
}

class MyClassImplementation :IMyInterface
{
   public int IntMethod(){}
   public string StringMethod(){}
}
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1  
@keesDijk This answer come across my thought as well. Just thinking this may be an overkill for his need. I agree with you that the beauty of using interface instead of inheritance is that you can have multiple interface used. However, it need extra code to handle the interface initial in your example. –  Zekta Chan Jan 3 '11 at 10:22
    
Yes there is always a trade off and only you can decide if it is a good fit. Handling the interface initial shouldn't be a problem use a dependency injection framework if you decide that that isn't overkill. –  KeesDijk Jan 3 '11 at 10:35
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And whats the problem in using composition?

class MyClassY
{
   private MyClassX myclx; 
   public int MyClassYIntMethod()
   {
     return myclx.MyClassXIntMethod();
   }
   public string MyClassYStringMethod(){...Similarly here...}
}

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Why not simply create a common super class, and let each "MyClass_" call that common function? You can have a different program signature and still reuse the same codes pieces. Without copy and paste the same code again.

class MyClassX extends MyClassGeneric
{
   public int MyClassXIntMethod(){}
   public string MyClassXStringMethod(){}
}

class MyClassY extends MyClassGeneric
{
   public int MyClassYIntMethod(){ return MyClassIntMethod();}
   public string MyClassYStringMethod(){return MyClassStringMethod();}
}

class MyClassGeneric
{
   protected int MyClassIntMethod(){ /*...... logic .....*/ return 0; }
   protected string MyClassStringMethod(){/*...... logic ....*/return "";}
}
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You might want to make the methods in MyClassGeneric protected so that they are not visible to users of MyClassX and MyClassY –  rsp Jan 3 '11 at 10:29
    
@rsp Thanks, overlooked that.... added back in code :) –  Zekta Chan Jan 3 '11 at 10:32
    
@Yup that's the way I'd solve this problem (+1) –  Sean Patrick Floyd Jan 3 '11 at 10:45
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Real world example.

Without "software patternitis". (I apply software patterns, very useful, but, I'm not adicted to them).


collections.hpp

#define pointer void*

class Collection {
protected:
  VIRTUAL bool isEmpty();

  VIRTUAL void Clear();
}

class ArrayBasedCollection: public Collection {
protected:
  int internalInsertFirst(pointer Item);
  int internalInsertLast(pointer Item);

  pointer internalExtractFirst(int Index);
  pointer internalExtractLast(int Index);
}

class Stack: public ArrayBasedCollection {
public:
  OVERLOADED bool isEmpty();
  OVERLOADED void Clear();

  // calls protected "internalInsertFirt"
  void Push(pointer Item);
  // calls protected "internalExtractLast"
  pointer Pop(pointer Item);
}

class Queue: public ArrayBasedCollection {
public:
  OVERLOADED bool isEmpty();
  OVERLOADED void Clear();

  // calls protected "internalInsertFirt"
  void Push(pointer Item);
  // calls protected "internalExtractFirst"
  pointer Pop(pointer Item);
}

Cheers.

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