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I've got a multidimensional array setup like the following:

array(
  [0]=>
  array(
    ["name"]=> "Foo"
    ["slug"]=> "Bar"
  )
  [1]=>
  array(
    ["name"]=> "Foo"
    ["slug"]=> "Bar"
  )
  [2]=>
  array(
    ["name"]=> "Test 1"
    ["slug"]=> "test-1"
  )
  [3]=>
  array(
    ["name"]=> "Test 2"
    ["slug"]=> "test-2"
  )
  [4]=>
  array(
    ["name"]=> "Test 3"
    ["slug"]=> "test-3"
  )
)

What would be the best way to search through the area for duplicates values in "name" and remove them, so that each value in the multidimensional array is unique?

Thanks in advance!

share|improve this question
    
Say you have a duplicate name but the slug value varies--what are you anticipating the result? (Which duplicate should be removed/deleted?) –  Brad Christie Jan 3 '11 at 14:25
    
@Brad Christie, in this particular case the name/slug combo will not vary. Thanks for your comment! :) –  hsatterwhite Jan 3 '11 at 14:28

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Since everyone given alternatives, here's a solution to the problem at-hand. Sometimes we have to work with the data we have, not re-arrange it the way we like it. That being said, this will remove all sub-sequent entries from the array that are duplicates.

$array = Array(
  Array(
    'name'  => 'Test 3',
    'slug'  => 'test-3'
  ),
  Array(
    'name'  => 'Foo',
    'slug'  => 'Bar'
  ),
  Array(
    'name'  => 'Foo',
    'slug'  => 'Bar'
  ),
  Array(
    'name'  => 'Test 1',
    'slug'  => 'test-1'
  ),
  Array(
    'name'  => 'Test 2',
    'slug'  => 'test-2'
  ),
  Array(
    'name'  => 'Test 3',
    'slug'  => 'test-3'
  ),
);
var_dump($array);

for ($e = 0; $e < count($array); $e++)
{
  $duplicate = null;
  for ($ee = $e+1; $ee < count($array); $ee++)
  {
    if (strcmp($array[$ee]['name'],$array[$e]['name']) === 0)
    {
      $duplicate = $ee;
      break;
    }
  }
  if (!is_null($duplicate))
    array_splice($array,$duplicate,1);
}
var_dump($array);

Which will look like this:

array(6) {
  [0]=>
  array(2) {
    ["name"]=>
    string(6) "Test 3"
    ["slug"]=>
    string(6) "test-3"
  }
  [1]=>
  array(2) {
    ["name"]=>
    string(3) "Foo"
    ["slug"]=>
    string(3) "Bar"
  }
  [2]=>
  array(2) {
    ["name"]=>
    string(3) "Foo"
    ["slug"]=>
    string(3) "Bar"
  }
  [3]=>
  array(2) {
    ["name"]=>
    string(6) "Test 1"
    ["slug"]=>
    string(6) "test-1"
  }
  [4]=>
  array(2) {
    ["name"]=>
    string(6) "Test 2"
    ["slug"]=>
    string(6) "test-2"
  }
  [5]=>
  array(2) {
    ["name"]=>
    string(6) "Test 3"
    ["slug"]=>
    string(6) "test-3"
  }
}
array(4) {
  [0]=>
  array(2) {
    ["name"]=>
    string(6) "Test 3"
    ["slug"]=>
    string(6) "test-3"
  }
  [1]=>
  array(2) {
    ["name"]=>
    string(3) "Foo"
    ["slug"]=>
    string(3) "Bar"
  }
  [2]=>
  array(2) {
    ["name"]=>
    string(6) "Test 1"
    ["slug"]=>
    string(6) "test-1"
  }
  [3]=>
  array(2) {
    ["name"]=>
    string(6) "Test 2"
    ["slug"]=>
    string(6) "test-2"
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the solution Brad! I like your point of view on taking care of the problem at hand and this works for me. Although I am going to take @Gobs' suggestion of looking in to a hash table, since I've never done so. Good opportunity to learn. :) –  hsatterwhite Jan 3 '11 at 15:19

You can use an associative array.

$temp_array = array();
foreach ($array as &$v) {
    if (!isset($temp_array[$v['name']]))
        $temp_array[$v['name']] =& $v;
}

This creates a temporary array, using $v['name'] as the key. If there is already an element with the same key, it is not added to the temporary array.

You can convert the associative array back to a sequential array, using

$array = array_values($temp_array);

Example code and output: http://codepad.org/zHfbtUrl

share|improve this answer
    
I like this, it's a pretty simple and compact means of doing the job. Thanks for your help and providing a link to a working example! :) –  hsatterwhite Jan 3 '11 at 15:18

Just looking at your particular case, I would recommend using a hash table instead of a 2-dimensional array. If you use your "name" as the key in the hash, each entry would be unique.

Is there a specific need for the multidimensional array?

share|improve this answer
    
Never used a hash table, but I'll certainly look in to it as you suggested. No specific need for the multidimensional array, it's just how I prepared the data at the time. Thanks for your suggestion and help. :) –  hsatterwhite Jan 3 '11 at 15:15

$array = array( 0 => array( "name"=> "Foo", "slug"=> "Bar" ), 1 => array( "name"=> "Foo", "slug"=> "Bar" ), 2 => array( "name"=> "Test 1", "slug"=> "test-1" ), 3 => array( "name"=> "Test 2", "slug"=> "test-2" ), 4 => array( "name"=> "Test 3", "slug"=> "test-3" ) );

function array_unique_by_key (&$array, $key) {
    $tmp = array();
    $result = array();
    foreach ($array as $value) {
        if (!in_array($value[$key], $tmp)) {
            array_push($tmp, $value[$key]);
            array_push($result, $value);
        }
    }
    return $array = $result;
}

array_unique_by_key($array, "name");
share|improve this answer

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