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I'm doing practice problems from MCTS Exam 70-536 Microsft .Net Framework Application Dev Foundation, and one of the problems is to create two classes, one generic, one object type that both perform the same thing; in which a loop uses the class and iterated over thousand times. And using the timer, time the performance of both. There was another post at C# generics question that seeks the same questoion but nonone replied.

Basically if in my code I run the generic class first it takes loger to process. If I run the object class first than the object class takes longer to process. The whole idea was to prove that generics perform faster.

I used the original users code to save me some time. I didn't particularly see anything wrong with the code and was puzzled by the outcome. Can some one explain why the unusual results?

Thanks,

Risho

Here is the code:

class Program
{
    class Object_Sample
    {            
        public Object_Sample()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Object_Sample Class");
        }

        public long getTicks()
        {
            return DateTime.Now.Ticks;
        }

        public void display(Object a)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("{0}", a);
        }
    }

    class Generics_Samle<T>
    {            
        public Generics_Samle()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Generics_Sample Class");
        }

        public long getTicks()
        {
            return DateTime.Now.Ticks;
        }

        public void display(T a)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("{0}", a);
        }
    }

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {            
        long ticks_initial, ticks_final, diff_generics, diff_object;
        Object_Sample OS = new Object_Sample();
        Generics_Samle<int> GS = new Generics_Samle<int>();

        //Generic Sample
        ticks_initial = 0;
        ticks_final = 0;
        ticks_initial = GS.getTicks();

        for (int i = 0; i < 50000; i++)
        {
            GS.display(i);
        }
        ticks_final = GS.getTicks();
        diff_generics = ticks_final - ticks_initial;

        //Object Sample
        ticks_initial = 0;
        ticks_final = 0;
        ticks_initial = OS.getTicks();

        for (int j = 0; j < 50000; j++)
        {
            OS.display(j);
        }

        ticks_final = OS.getTicks();
        diff_object = ticks_final - ticks_initial;

        Console.WriteLine("\nPerformance of Generics {0}", diff_generics);
        Console.WriteLine("Performance of Object {0}", diff_object);

        Console.ReadKey();
    }
}
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3  
You should accept answers to your questions. –  SLaks Jan 3 '11 at 14:35
1  
You should use the Stopwatch class. –  SLaks Jan 3 '11 at 14:35
1  
You should click the hollow check next to the best answer given for each of your questions to accept that answer. –  SLaks Jan 3 '11 at 16:07
1  
Didn't realize you guys are collecting brownie points. I'll will check the correct answer after I digest all of your comments. –  Risho Jan 3 '11 at 16:18
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5 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Your test is incorrect. Here are your methods:

public void display(T a)
{
    Console.WriteLine("{0}", a); // Console.WriteLine(string format, params object[] args) <- boxing is performed here
}

public void display(Object a)// <- boxing is performed here
{
    Console.WriteLine("{0}", a); 
}

So, in both cases you are using boxing. Much better would be if your class, for example, will count total sum of values, like:

public void add(long a)
{
    Total += a;
}

public void display(Object a)// <- boxing is performed here
{
    Total += (long) a;// <- unboxing is performed here
}
share|improve this answer
    
I did not write this code, I just wanted to test what the book has sugested. In your comment you state that "public void display(Object a)" boxing is performed here. Can you explain that, please? I'm not coverting here anything am I? –  Risho Jan 3 '11 at 16:29
    
long is value type. When you are casting value type to object, it is called 'boxing'. That means that value type is wrapped by special 'box', which is reference type. At this moment .Net need to allocate memory for this 'box' and this is not so fast operation. When you cast object to value type it is called 'unboxing', value is copied from 'box' to your variable. When you are calling method with signature method(object a) .Net performs implicit cast of your long to object and that produces some performance gap because of boxing. –  Victor Haydin Jan 3 '11 at 17:00
    
So, it doesn't matter what type of input argument you are using in your display method, because in 'object' case boxing taking place on display method call, and in 'generic' on Console.WriteLine method call - but it still taking place. –  Victor Haydin Jan 3 '11 at 17:04
    
Thank for clarifying that. –  Risho Jan 3 '11 at 18:31
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Well, the first problem I can see is that you're using the DateTime object to measure time in your application (for a very small interval).

You should be using the Stopwatch class. It offers better precision when trying to benchmark code.

The second problem is that you're not allowing for JIT (Just-In-Time compilation). The first call to your code is going to take longer simply because it has to be JIT'd. After that, you'll get your results.

I would make a single call in to your code before you start timing things so you can get an accurate idea of what is happening during the loop.

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1  
+1 For Stopwatch –  Andrew Hare Jan 3 '11 at 14:38
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You should run both classes a separate time before timing it to allow the JITter to run.

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+1 This sounds like the jitter to me as well. –  Andrew Hare Jan 3 '11 at 14:37
    
Did you check his profile to see if there are acceptable answers? –  Henk Holterman Jan 3 '11 at 14:38
1  
@Henk - I think after 13 questions at least one answer would be acceptable. But again, acceptability is in the eye of the beholder. –  Andrew Hare Jan 3 '11 at 14:39
1  
@Henk: stackoverflow.com/questions/1948987/… –  SLaks Jan 3 '11 at 14:40
    
Henk: the "accepted answers" only accounts for acceptable questions, which are 9 out of 13 in this case. And 0 of the 9 are accepted. –  Femaref Jan 3 '11 at 14:40
show 1 more comment
  1. Your timed code includes a Console.WriteLine(). That will take up 99.999999% of the time.
  2. Your assumption that generic will be faster in this situation is wrong. You may have misinterpreted a remark about non-generic collection classes.
  3. This won't be on he exam.
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why would it be faster? both ints must be boxed in order to use Console.WriteLine(string, object)

edit: ToString() itself does not seem to cause boxing http://weblogs.asp.net/ngur/archive/2003/12/16/43856.aspx

so when you use Console.WriteLine(a); which would call Console.WriteLine(Int32) that should work i guess (i would need to look into reflector to confirm this)

share|improve this answer
    
The text book indicated that generics are faster. –  Risho Jan 3 '11 at 16:07
    
well they are faster if they prevent boxing and unboxing, but that is not the case here –  Kikaimaru Jan 3 '11 at 16:11
    
I'm trying to understand this: I'm not convertig anyting here, unless Console.WriteLines does, which I didn't know. If that is the case how do you display the results without "boxing/unboxing"? –  Risho Jan 3 '11 at 16:35
    
If you want to example when generics are faster make ArrayList and List<int> and compute sum. –  Kikaimaru Jan 3 '11 at 18:26
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