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I have this script that drops the user to an IRB session when executed.

All good, but when I use *nix pipes to get the input (e.g. with cat), the IRB session ends immediately.

I could reduce the script (let's call it myscript.rb) to the following:

require 'irb'

if $stdin.stat.size > 0
  @text = $stdin.read 
else
  @text= "nothing"
end

ARGV.clear
IRB.start

When executed like: ruby myscript.rb, I end up in the IRB session (as expected).

But (assuming foo.txt exists in the cwd): cat foo.txt | ruby myscript.rb will just print the IRB prompt and then the IRB session is closed (I'm being dropped to $bash).

Any known workarounds or ideas?

BTW: it has the same behavior on ruby 1.8.7 as well as on 1.9.2.

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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think your problem is that when you pipe to your script STDIN will be the stream from your file, so when when you start IRB it will read from the same stream, but notice that it's at its end, and quit, just like it would when you type ctrl-D (which is a manual end of file signal).

You can reopen STDIN to read from the tty (i.e. the keyboard) like this:

STDIN.reopen(File.open('/dev/tty', 'r'))

but it looks a bit weird for me, I don't get the proper IRB promt. IRB works though.

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looks like this is the issue, and reopening $stdin will create a default (I guess) IRB (no prompt, .irbrc not read and so on). –  aurelian Jan 3 '11 at 15:04
    
on the other hand rewind or seek(0) on $stdin won't work (is tty). –  aurelian Jan 3 '11 at 15:04
    
What do you mean by seek(0) not working, why would you need it to? If I wasn't clear I meant that you reopen stdin just before IRB.start. –  Theo Jan 3 '11 at 15:16
    
instead of reopen I was trying to do $stdin.rewind (or .seek). you were very clear, thanks for you answer. –  aurelian Jan 3 '11 at 15:22
    
+1 I've always wondered how to read from stdin past one or more EOFs. You probably want the block form of File.open so you don't leak file descriptors. –  Kelvin Feb 29 '12 at 18:17
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@Theo identified the problem.

Also, requiring irb before IRB.start will fix missing IRB settings. In the end, the code looks like this:

if $stdin.stat.size > 0
  @text = $stdin.read
  $stdin.reopen(File.open("/dev/tty", "r"))
else
  @text= "nothing"
end

require 'irb'
ARGV.clear
IRB.start
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$stdin.read reads your input before IRB has a chance to read it (if you're trying to force IRB to execute commands from stdin).

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foo.txt is just a plain text file. –  aurelian Jan 3 '11 at 15:00
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