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//GUITEXT
class guitext : public entity {
public:
    guitext(graphics *gfx, std::string _text, float _x, float _y, 
        float _size, float timeToLive);
    bool update(float deltaTime, gameworld *world);
    void draw(graphics *gfx);
};

void guitext::draw(graphics *gfx) { printf("draw"); }

//ENTITY

class entity {
public:
    virtual bool update(float deltaTime, gameworld *world) 
        { return false; }
    virtual void draw(graphics *gfx) { }
};

//GAMEWORLD

void gameworld::addEntity(entity e) { entitys.push_back(e); }

//MAIN 

for(int i = 0; i < (int)entitys.size(); i++) { entitys[i].draw(gfx); }

I have a vector in my gameworld class. When I add push a guitext entity to this vector I expect it to call the guitext::draw() function. But the base class function is being called. What am I doing wrong?

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possible duplicate of C++ Overriding Methods –  Charles Bailey Jan 3 '11 at 16:52
1  
Comment on code: Rather than use the correct type you think casting away the problem (int)entitys.size() is a good idea! Learn never to use the C-Style cast operator and use the C++ case operators only when absolutely necessary. –  Loki Astari Jan 3 '11 at 18:06

6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You made a vector of entity. Those objects always have type entity. If you want to invoke polymorphism, they need to be pointers or references. How can a vector of entity store a guitext? There's not enough space, it doesn't know how to destroy it, etc etc.

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@Martin: Someone else already posted an answer with a link to slicing. I'm all for writing wonder answers, but I'm not gonna dupe. –  Puppy Jan 3 '11 at 18:23

Was the vector declared as vector<entity>? Then only the base class part can be stored there, i.e. you lose polymorphism (which only works through pointer or reference in C++).

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I believe that it only works through pointer or reference in any language, but that most languages have virtually exclusive GC references, like Java or C#. –  Puppy Jan 3 '11 at 16:29
    
Yes, under the hood, but C++ requires explicit syntax. –  Nikolai N Fetissov Jan 3 '11 at 16:37

What you've done is a bit concealed variant of slicing.

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You should define entitys to contain pointers to entity. Slightly edited example derived from your code.

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <vector>
#include <string>

class entity 
{
public:
    virtual void draw() { }
};

class guitext : public entity 
{
public:
    void draw()
    {
        printf("draw");
    }
};

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    std::vector<entity *> entitys;

    guitext g;

    entitys.push_back(&g); 

    for(int i = 0; i < (int)entitys.size(); i++) 
    { 
        entitys[i]->draw(); 
    }

    return 0;
}
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1  
C++'s default entrypoint is int main, and there is no standard _TCHAR in C++. stdafx.h is some Microsoft-specific extension. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 3 '11 at 16:25
    
Yes, This is a compilable and runnable example (on Visual Studio) to illustrate the point. –  Kip9000 Jan 4 '11 at 13:44

You're storing Entitys, not pointers to objects of varying derived types of Entity.

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In addition, in your case it's not good idea to pass arguments by value, i suppose there will be very big quantity of objects that need to be redrawed. Better, by const reference, since functon doesn't change state of passed object inside.

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