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So I need to consume a Web Service that uses a custom SoapHeader, as described below. What is the simplest way to pass the correct values through this header using Java. I'm using Netbeans.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?\>
<soap:Envelope xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns:xsd="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:soap="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/soap/envelope/">
  <soap:Header>
    <CustomSoapHeader xmlns="http://snip">
      <UserName>"string"</UserName>
      <Password>"string"</Password>
    </CustomSoapHeader>
  </soap:Header>
  <soap:Body>
    <SomeWebMethod xmlns="http://snip" />
  </soap:Body>
</soap:Envelope>

EDIT: What's the best way to display XML on Stack Overflow?

It might help to add that the Web Service is implemented in .NET and I cannot change the server side code.

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Did you try wrapping the XML in the <pre> and <code> tags? –  Adrien Jul 14 '09 at 22:57
    
Doesn't seem to I just did <pre> <code> <bunch of xml> </code> </pre> Is that right? –  Mark Withers Jul 15 '09 at 10:32
    
You need a blank line. –  John Saunders Jul 16 '09 at 3:12
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here are the basic steps, assuming you're doing this on the client side:

  • Install a HandlerResolver on your service interface (service.setHandlerResolver())
  • Override HandlerResolver.getHandlerChain() to insert your own implementation of SOAPHandler
  • Implement SOAPHandler.handleMessage() to modify the SOAP header before it's sent out

You can pass parameters to your handler through the request context:

Map<String, Object> context = ((BindingProvider) port).getRequestContext();
context.put("userName', "foo");
...

in handleMessage() you can get at the header like this:

public boolean handleMessage(SOAPMessageContext context) {
    ...

    SOAPMessage msg = context.getMessage();
    msg.getSoapHeader();
    ...

}

Hope that helps. I'm guessing there's also a way to do this stuff with annotations as well.

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