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I have constant multi-dimensional arrays of different sizes. I would like to pass them to a function. However, I would get the error missing subscript, the sizes of the arrays are different so I can't put the subscript in the array paramater. What is the solution to this problem? Thank you.

Here is an example code. The actual arrays are bigger.

//ARRAY1
const double ARRAY1[3][2][2] =
{
    {
        {1.0,1.0},
        {1.0,1.0},
    }
    ,
    {
        {1.0,1.0},
        {1.0,1.0},
    }
    ,
    {
        {1.0,1.0},
        {1.0,1.0},
    }
}
//ARRAY2
const double ARRAY2[2][2][2] =
{
    {
        {1.0,1.0},
        {1.0,1.0},
    }
    ,
    {
        {1.0,1.0},
        {1.0,1.0},
    }
}

//How to declare the parameter?
double SomeFunctionToWorkWithBothArrays(const double arr[][][])
{

}
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7 Answers 7

up vote 12 down vote accepted

You could use a template.

template<size_t first, size_t second, size_t third> 
double SomeFunction(const double (&arr)[first][second][third]) {
    return first + second + third;
}

This function takes a reference to a three-dimensional array of doubles where all dimensions are known at compile-time. It's actually possible to take this reference via template, if desperate.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you guys for your help. I will use templates for it. –  Amin1Amin1 Jan 3 '11 at 15:19
    
+1 for this tricky solution. :-) –  Nawaz Jan 3 '11 at 15:23
    
@Nawaz: How exactly is it tricky? –  Puppy Jan 3 '11 at 15:54
1  
Don't see why it's tricky. It's pretty basic use of templates! –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 3 '11 at 16:14
1  
One thing to watch is that each version of the function will get its own implicit instantiation of the function code. –  Crappy Experience Bye Jan 3 '11 at 18:02

Use std::vector instead of arrays. Vectors know their own size, so that would be no problem. You can use vectors of vectors as multi-dimensional arrays.

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That's quite a bit of heap overhead for the dynamic size he clearly doesn't need. –  Puppy Jan 3 '11 at 15:04
    
@DeadMG: true, and indeed I 'm answering a slightly different question here. But still, IMHO "go with vectors" is a good rule of thumb. –  Jon Jan 3 '11 at 15:07
1  
Could have answered vector of arrays (i.e., boost/std:: array), like vector<array<array<double, 2>, 2>> –  Puppy Jan 3 '11 at 15:10
    
It's barely any overhead actually, and dynamic allocation doesn't mandate the use of any 'heap'. However, sticking with static allocation where possible is indeed preferred. :) –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 3 '11 at 16:13

You can either use std::vector (whose size is variable and doesn't need to be specified in the type), or you can stick with static allocation and use templates:

template <size_t X, size_t Y, size_t Z>
double SomeFunctionToWorkWithBothArrays(const double (&arr)[X][Y][Z])
{
   // A different version of this function will
   // exist for each combination of X, Y and Z.
}

(In this example I have assumed that all three dimensions may differ.)

Also note that I am passing the array by reference; you actually cannot pass an array by value, as the argument will collapse into a pointer, and with multi-dimensional arrays this gets a little complicated.

Hope this helps.

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You can use the boost::array template class and a template function declaration to handle this.

EDIT: Just to add an example:

template<typename T, std::size_t I, std::size_t J, std::size_t K>
void MyFunction(const std::array<std::array<std::array<T, K>, J>, I>& data)
{
    // do something here
}

which you would call in the manner of:

std::array<std::array<std::array<T, 4>, 2>, 3> data; // which hopefully you have typedef'd somewhere to make the code more readable
MyFunction<double, 3, 2, 4>(data);
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I know of 2 approaches for this problem:

  1. Use a sentinel value as last entry to the array, eg. {-1.0,-1.0}. You always just need to check the first value in the next major dimension
  2. Add additional parameter(s) to the function, which specifies the size of dimension(s), eg. x, y, z or struct dim { int x, y, z};

Regards,

Martin.

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If it is only the first dimension that is variable (the other dimensions are the same for all arrays), then you can still pass the arrays to the same function, because you are allowed to leave the first array dimension out in a function parameter.

double SomeFunctionToWorkWithBothArrays(const double arr[][2][2])
{

}

If the other dimensions can change as well, then you will have to use different functions, possibly created from a single template, as shown in the answer from @DeadMG.

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1  
True, but you should really mention that with this approach you need to pass the size of the first dimension as a parameter. –  j_random_hacker Jan 3 '11 at 15:23

If and only if the arrangement of multi-dimensional arrays is defined by the standard (Question to the standards gurus) you could do the following:

in your header:

double SomeFunctionToWorkWithBothArraysInt(double const *data, int x, int y, int z);

template <size_t X, size_t Y, size_t Z>
double SomeFunctionToWorkWithBothArrays(double const (&arr)[X][Y][Z]) {
  SomeFunctionToWorkWithBothArraysInt(&arr, X, Y, Z);
}

in your .cpp file:

double SomeFunctionToWorkWithBothArraysInt(double const *data, int x, int y, int z) {
  double res = 0.0;
  for (int xp = 0; xp < x; xp++) {
    for (int yp = 0; yp < y; yp++) {
      for (int zp = 0; zp < z; zp++) {
        res += data[(zp * y + yp) * x + xp]; // !!!ATTENTION!!!: This may be wrong if the array arrangement is different!
      }  
    }  
  }

  return res;
}

The advantage is that your "business logic" is not instantiated with each instantiation of the template function and is not exposed via the header file.

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