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I have these 3 queries:

SELECT
  title, year, MovieGenres(m.mid) genres,
  MovieDirectors(m.mid) directors, MovieWriters(m.mid) writers,
  synopsis, poster_url
FROM movies m
WHERE m.mid = 1;

SELECT AVG(rating) FROM movie_ratings WHERE mid = 1;

SELECT COUNT(rating) FROM movie_ratings WHERE mid = 1;

And I need to join them into a single query. I was able to do it like this:

SELECT
  title, year, MovieGenres(m.mid) genres,
  MovieDirectors(m.mid) directors, MovieWriters(m.mid) writers,
  synopsis, poster_url, AVG(rating) average, COUNT(rating) count
FROM movies m INNER JOIN movie_ratings mr
  ON m.mid = mr.mid
WHERE m.mid = 1
GROUP BY
  title, year, MovieGenres(m.mid), MovieDirectors(m.mid),
  MovieWriters(m.mid), synopsis, poster_url;

But I don't really like that "huge" GROUP BY, is there a simpler way to do it?

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1  
It's silly to program by your own personal preferences for "tidy" code. When you say, "I don't really like that "huge" group by." you could not sound more unprofessional. I'm not saying this to be mean in any way. First, it's not huge by any standard. That's a very ordinarily sized group by. Second, it is what it is. You should write queries which do the following things; 1. Scale. Database activity must scale well. 2. Maintainable. Your query should meet a standard for syntax and format. –  Stephanie Page Jan 3 '11 at 20:06
1  
I strongly urge you to eliminate the UDF's. Although they might make the SQL look cleaner, they kill your scalability and performance. Tom Kyte's rule 1 is do everything in SQL that you can... when you CAN'T do it in SQL do it in PL/SQL. If director and writer are just other relational tables then join them all up. If they are SOA calls or something like that... then leave them. –  Stephanie Page Jan 3 '11 at 20:11
    
What I meant by that is that it doesn't make sense to me and there's gotta be a better way. I mean, if I had to select a bunch of fields but not all (where I could use *) I would have to put them all in GROUP BY, it doesn't make sense to me in the sense that I know only the basics of Oracle SQL and maybe there's better ways to do what I'm after, maybe there isn't. That's what SO is for, right? –  Ricardo Amaral Jan 4 '11 at 0:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You could do something like this:

SELECT title
      ,year
      ,MovieGenres(m.mid) genres
      ,MovieDirectors(m.mid) directors
      ,MovieWriters(m.mid) writers
      ,synopsis
      ,poster_url
      ,(select avg(mr.rating) 
         from movie_ratings mr 
        where mr.mid = m.mid) as avg_rating
      ,(select count(rating)  
         from movie_ratings mr 
        where mr.mid = m.mid) as num_ratings
  FROM movies m
 WHERE m.mid = 1;

or even

with grouped as(
   select avg(rating)   as avg_rating 
         ,count(rating) as num_ratings
     from movie_ratings 
    where mid = 1
)
select title
      ,year
      ,MovieGenres(m.mid) genres
      ,MovieDirectors(m.mid) directors
      ,MovieWriters(m.mid) writers
      ,synopsis
      ,poster_url
      ,avg_rating
      ,num_ratings
  from movies m cross join grouped
 where m.mid = 1;
share|improve this answer
    
Ooh, scrap mine, I like that one best. –  MPelletier Jan 3 '11 at 15:37
    
I never understood the implications and differences between calling 3 SQL queries or doing a single SQL query with 3 SELECT's as above... –  Ricardo Amaral Jan 3 '11 at 15:46
    
@Nazgulled, do you mean 3 separate database calls? –  Ronnis Jan 3 '11 at 16:27
    
Yes, 3 database calls. –  Ricardo Amaral Jan 3 '11 at 16:47
2  
It has scalability implications when the number of queries add up. A database call for 10 ms may seem fast when executed by itself, but do 1000 of them and it takes 10 seconds. Often it is better to "bulk up" and do larger operations in fewer calls (as long as it doesn't confuse the optimizer). Also, calls to PL/SQL functions (MovieGenres, MovieDirectors, MovieWriters) often causes row-based processing which works just fine for small queries like yours (I asumed that mid is unique in your example?), but does not scale very well when the number of rows in the outer query increases. –  Ronnis Jan 3 '11 at 17:20

I guess I don't see the problem with having several GroupBy columns. That's a very common pattern in SQL. Of course, code clarity is often in the eye of the beholder.

Check the explain plans for the two approaches; my guess is you'll get better performance with your original version since it only needs to process the movie_ratings table once. But I haven't checked, and that will be somewhat data and installation dependent.

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how about

SELECT
  title, year, MovieGenres(m.mid) genres,
  MovieDirectors(m.mid) directors, MovieWriters(m.mid) writers,
  synopsis, poster_url,
  (SELECT AVG(rating) FROM movie_ratings WHERE mid = 1) av,
  (SELECT COUNT(rating) FROM movie_ratings WHERE mid = 1) cnt 
FROM movies m
WHERE m.mid = 1;

or

SELECT
  title, year, MovieGenres(m.mid) genres,
  MovieDirectors(m.mid) directors, MovieWriters(m.mid) writers,
  synopsis, poster_url,
  av.av,
  cnt.cnt 
FROM movies m,
  (SELECT AVG(rating) av FROM movie_ratings WHERE mid = 1) av,
  (SELECT COUNT(rating) cnt FROM movie_ratings WHERE mid = 1) cnt 
WHERE m.mid = 1;
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