Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm creating a console app in Visual Studio 2010 with c#. I want this app to be stand alone, in that all you need is the exe, and you can run it from anywhere. I also want to use app.config to store connection strings and so on.

My problem is that I can't seem to figure out how to include that app.config data into the compiled exe. I do see it creates appname.exe.config, but I don't want people to have to worry about grabbing two separate files when they get the app.

None of the googling I've done has come up with anything. Is this even possible?

share|improve this question
    
AFAIK there is no way to include the config file into the exe. If the configuration is simple you can just store it in a file of your own and create that file on the first run with the default settings. Another option is also the windows registry, but then, you have to run elevated in Vista or above (which itself is not difficult) –  gideon Jan 3 '11 at 16:33
2  
possible duplicate of Configuration File as Embedded Resource –  John Saunders Jan 3 '11 at 16:35
    
Think this through a bit. If it were possible, your user couldn't change the connection string anymore. Defeating the point of having one. A single file is never a problem, it's called setup.exe –  Hans Passant Jan 3 '11 at 17:10
    
Re: duplicate, That one didn't come up in my searching. Which is too bad because it did answer my question. Though I've got to say, hard coding app settings as opposed to a convenient config file leaves me feeling unsatisfied. I guess it's the web programmer in me. –  Patches Jan 3 '11 at 17:32
1  
@HansPassant The problem is things like WCF are designed around the config file, it's possible to configure them in code, but always less documented and more complicated to do. XML in itself is better at setting up configs than C# is, so it be nice if you could configure WCF in the app.config, but have it embedded if you don't need the user to ever change those configs. –  didibus Aug 23 '13 at 20:51
show 4 more comments

7 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can't. Half the point of such config files is to allow changes to the configuration of the app outside of the app itself.

You would simply have to modify your program so that it didn't have a dependency on the app config file -- easiest way to do that would be to just stick the values inside your config into read only global variables.

share|improve this answer
    
I guess I missed the point of config files. I'll have to hard set them. –  Patches Jan 3 '11 at 17:26
add comment

You mean you need to add it to the exe as a resource? Well, first of all you cannot, app.config is file based not resource based.

On the other hand, the only point of config file is that you can change it. Otherwise just hard-code or use constants.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I can see where you are going with this, but the answer might be a bit more complicated than you were looking for.

  1. Make app.config to be an embedded resource.
  2. Manually parse the app.config to get default app settings / connection strings / etc
  3. Still look for an app.config and override the defaults you read in earlier with the app.config values

This way you have some reasonable defaults that you don't have to maintain separate from you app.config as constants, you can run your app as just an exe, and you can still modify it at runtime by adding back in the app.config.

The one thing to remember, is that reading in the app.config from a resource won't give you the same behavior as the normal app.config. You are basically reading it in and using it by hand.

share|improve this answer
    
Ug, yea, the idea here make things easier, not harder. It looks like I'm better off just making a settings object in my code. –  Patches Jan 3 '11 at 17:11
add comment

Generally, you don't want to do this as your app.config provides a mechanism by which configuration may be done at runtime. As far as you specific goal (maintaining configuration outside of your code, but have it follow the binary), you have a couple of options:

  • Dynamically create a configuration file
  • Store the settings in the registry
  • Store the settings as resource strings within the console application

I am sure there are other, more creative, options available. My recommendation would be for the second option. When the application is first launched, create the necessary keys and set their default values from the executable. That way, if you need to do any debugging at a later date, you can simply run regedit and make any necessary changes without recompiling.

share|improve this answer
    
I wanted the thing to be totally independent, so I think I'll leave the registry alone. Looks like your option 3 is the best for my purposes. –  Patches Jan 3 '11 at 17:13
add comment

Please the first answer on this previous post - Configuration File as Embedded Resource

share|improve this answer
add comment

As others have pointed out, the idea behind a configuration file is to avoid hard-coded values.

What you might do as an alternative is to to write a custom configuration section, with every element optional and with default values. That way anyone who can get by with the defaults doesn't need a config file. But if they need to override a default, they can provide one.

(Sorry, just a bit of brainstorming. I don't have an example available.)

share|improve this answer
add comment

Like people are saying here the whole point of a config file is for modifying some settings outside the application. You can hard-code or use constants but you can also use the registry in windows if you want. That way you can make changes to the application and still only have a single exe file.

The code project has some good info about reading, writing and deleting from the registry. http://www.codeproject.com/KB/system/modifyregistry.aspx But be careful when editing the registry. Alot of applications are depending on it so you could destroy some settings if you do something wrong. I recommend reading and then doing.

public string Read(string KeyName)  {
RegistryKey rk = baseRegistryKey;
// Open a subKey as read-only

RegistryKey sk1 = rk.OpenSubKey(subKey);
// If the RegistrySubKey doesn't exist -> (null)

if ( sk1 == null )
{
    return null;
}
else
{
    try 
    {
        // If the RegistryKey exists I get its value
        // or null is returned.
        return (string)sk1.GetValue(KeyName.ToUpper());
    }
    catch (Exception e)
    {
        // AAAAAAAAAAARGH, an error!
        ShowErrorMessage(e, "Reading registry " + KeyName.ToUpper());
        return null;
    }
  }
}

public bool Write(string KeyName, object Value)  {
  try
  {
      // Setting
      RegistryKey rk = baseRegistryKey ;
      // I have to use CreateSubKey 
      // (create or open it if already exits), 
      // 'cause OpenSubKey open a subKey as read-only
      RegistryKey sk1 = rk.CreateSubKey(subKey);
      // Save the value
      sk1.SetValue(KeyName.ToUpper(), Value);
      return true;
  }
  catch (Exception e) {
        // AAAAAAAAAAARGH, an error!
        ShowErrorMessage(e, "Writing registry " + KeyName.ToUpper());
        return false;
    }
  }    

public bool DeleteKey(string KeyName)  {
  try
  {
      // Setting
      RegistryKey rk = baseRegistryKey ;
      RegistryKey sk1 = rk.CreateSubKey(subKey);
      // If the RegistrySubKey doesn't exists -> (true)
      if ( sk1 == null )
          return true;
      else
          sk1.DeleteValue(KeyName);
      return true;
  }
  catch (Exception e)
  {
      // AAAAAAAAAAARGH, an error!
      ShowErrorMessage(e, "Deleting SubKey " + subKey);
      return false;
  }
}

Of course this would only work on Windows. I assume that you are using Visual Studio so you are probably using Windows.

Happy coding and good luck!

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.