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Is there an API to get the number of CPUs available in Linux? I mean, without using /proc/cpuinfo or any other sys-node file...

I've found this implementation using sched.h:

int GetCPUCount()
{
 cpu_set_t cs;
 CPU_ZERO(&cs);
 sched_getaffinity(0, sizeof(cs), &cs);

 int count = 0;
 for (int i = 0; i < 8; i++)
 {
  if (CPU_ISSET(i, &cs))
   count++;
 }
 return count;
}

But, isn't there anything more higher level using common libraries? Thanks...

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16  
Why are people so afraid to use /proc? Every Linux box i've seen in the past 15 years has it, it's always up to date with what the kernel knows, and the format of the existing stuff in it doesn't change much. –  cHao Jan 3 '11 at 16:58
    
I think it's great that you're trying to learn different ways of doing things, but are you trying to reinvent the wheel? –  Davidann Jan 3 '11 at 17:09
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4 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

This code should work on both windows and *NIX platforms.

#ifdef _WIN32
#define WIN32_LEAN_AND_MEAN
#include <windows.h>
#else
#include <unistd.h>
#endif
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <errno.h>


int main() {
  long nprocs = -1;
  long nprocs_max = -1;
#ifdef _WIN32
#ifndef _SC_NPROCESSORS_ONLN
SYSTEM_INFO info;
GetSystemInfo(&info);
#define sysconf(a) info.dwNumberOfProcessors
#define _SC_NPROCESSORS_ONLN
#endif
#endif
#ifdef _SC_NPROCESSORS_ONLN
  nprocs = sysconf(_SC_NPROCESSORS_ONLN);
  if (nprocs < 1)
  {
    fprintf(stderr, "Could not determine number of CPUs online:\n%s\n", 
strerror (errno));
    exit (EXIT_FAILURE);
  }
  nprocs_max = sysconf(_SC_NPROCESSORS_CONF);
  if (nprocs_max < 1)
  {
    fprintf(stderr, "Could not determine number of CPUs configured:\n%s\n", 
strerror (errno));
    exit (EXIT_FAILURE);
  }
  printf ("%ld of %ld processors online\n",nprocs, nprocs_max);
  exit (EXIT_SUCCESS);
#else
  fprintf(stderr, "Could not determine number of CPUs");
  exit (EXIT_FAILURE);
#endif
}
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I got this code a long time back from some one (don't remember the name). –  Vikram.exe Jan 3 '11 at 18:10
2  
I'm not sure posting this code snippet really answers the OP's question, although they might reverse-engineer some useful info out of it. –  MarkR Jan 4 '11 at 6:47
1  
I agree with MarkR. chrisaycock provides a succinct answer. –  poindexter Jul 5 '12 at 17:41
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sysconf(_SC_NPROCESSORS_ONLN);
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Using /proc/cpuinfo is the cleanest and most portable solution. In case the open fails, you could simply assume 1 cpu or 2 cpus. Code that depends on knowing the number of cpus for a purpose other than micro-optimizing (e.g. choosing the ideal number of threads to run) is almost surely doing something dumb.

The _SC_NPROCESSORS_ONLN solution depends on a non-standard (glibc-specific) sysconf extension, which is a much bigger dependency than /proc (all Linux systems have /proc, but some have non-glibc libcs or older versions of glibc that lack _SC_NPROCESSORS_ONLN).

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7  
+1 The OP seemed adamant about hanging himself, so I just gave him the rope. –  chrisaycock Jan 3 '11 at 17:19
2  
I think Ulrich Drepper gave him the rope. I really don't understand the motivation for adding non-standard things like this when there's an existing, much cleaner and much more portable way to do the same thing. (If you write _SC_NPROCESSORS_ONLN in your program, it will fail to compile if the constant is missing, but the other ways just fail at runtime (failed open, etc.) and any sane code would handle the failure condition.) –  R.. Jan 3 '11 at 17:24
3  
In what way is /proc/cpuinfo portable? This is a Linux-specific interface (some other systems emulate it, for example, FreeBSD with the linprocfs filesystem mounted in /proc). the sysconfig _SC_NPROCESSORS_ONLN for example, is supported by FreeBSD. –  MarkR Jan 4 '11 at 6:50
2  
It's portable in that it doesn't prevent your program from running on systems where it's not available, and on systems where /proc doesn't have a special meaning, a simple text file with the right information could be stored by the administrator in /proc/cpuinfo. –  R.. Jan 4 '11 at 13:37
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sched_affinity() version you mention in the beginning is still better than /proc/cpuinfo and/or _SC_NPROCESSORS_ONLN since it only counts CPUs available for a given process (some may be disabled by sched_setaffinity() invoked by an outside process). The only change would be using CPU_COUNT() instead of doing CPU_ISSET in a loop.

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