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Is there any way to do this?

SELECT sum(price) from table2 WHERE id=(SELECT theid FROM table1 WHERE user_id="myid")

I have table1 with items' IDs, that a user has purchased. I want to calculate the sum of all items purchased by user.

Is the query above legal? If not, what's the correct form?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Change where id=(SELECT to where id IN (SELECT

Or what you really want is probably:

SELECT sum(price) FROM table2 INNER JOIN table1 ON table2.id = table1.theid WHERE table1.user_id = 'my_id'
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you query is ok, as long as the subselect is returning only one row every time.

if there are more rows returned, you'll have to change your query to:

[...] WHERE id IN (SELECT [...]

NOTE: in you case, a simple inner join like others suggested would be much more redable (and maybe a tiny little bit faster) - but what you've written is absolutely ok (there are always multiple ways to get the desired result - and it's now always easy to tell wich one is "the best" ;-) )

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You can also use the JOIN syntax

SELECT sum(price) from table2 t2
join table1 t1 on t1.theID = t2.id
WHERE t1.user_id="myid"

Should give you the same result

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Good answer "Phil" LOL –  Sparky Jan 3 '11 at 17:05
    
Great minds think alike :D –  Phil Hunt Jan 3 '11 at 17:06

A JOIN would be more readable:

SELECT SUM(price) FROM table2
INNER JOIN table1 ON table2.id = table1.theid
WHERE table1.user_id = "myid"
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and would allow vast optimisations –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 3 '11 at 17:15

You should use SQL JOIN to provide that functionality.

SELECT SUM(table2.price) JOIN table1 ON
table2.id=table1.theid WHERE table1.user_id="myid"
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