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Is it possible to create an instance of an interface in Java?

Somewhere I have read that using inner anonymous class we can do it as shown below:

interface Test  
{  
    public void wish();  
}  
class Main  
{  
    public static void main(String[] args)  
    {  
        Test t=new Test()  
        {  
            public void wish()  
            {  
                System.out.println("output: hello how r u");  
            }  
        };  
    t.wish();  
    }  
}    

cmd> javac Main.java  
cmd> java Main  
output: hello how r u  

Is it correct here?

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This has already been asked here: stackoverflow.com/questions/4000062/… –  jjnguy Jan 3 '11 at 19:06
    
possible duplicate of can we create an object of an interface? –  jjnguy Jan 3 '11 at 19:06
    
Why would you need that ? The purpose of interfaces is to have empty methods to be extended with your own functionality . –  Ahmed Jan 3 '11 at 19:06
3  
@Ahmed: in order to fast prototype an interface implementation? Or maybe implement an event handler, without having to create a named class just to do that? And so on... –  rsenna Jan 3 '11 at 19:13
    
does the class constructor just know that the methods in the interface are. I think that annoynymous classes are confusing at best and then even worse when you have the beginning and ending bracket put together with a method in the middle. –  Doug Hauf Jan 22 at 20:12
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6 Answers

Short answer...yes. You can use an anonymous class when you initialize a variable. Take a look at this

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You can never instantiate an interface in java. You can, however, refer to an object that implements an interface by the type of the interface. For example,

public interface A
{
}
public class B implements A
{
}

public static void main(String[] args)
{
    A test = new B();
    //A test = new A(); // wont compile
}

What you did above was create a Anonomous class that implements the interface. You are creating a Anonomous object, not an object of type interface Test.

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2  
Anonymous classes don't have names....anonymous –  jjnguy Jan 3 '11 at 19:08
1  
He's asked if his example was correct, and it is. Not sure if you have acknowledged that... –  rsenna Jan 3 '11 at 19:11
    
The example works...but not like he thinks it does. Its important to understand what the code is really doing. I wouldn't call it "correct" if the code is something different then he thinks it is. –  Chad La Guardia Jan 3 '11 at 19:14
    
@JJnguy, all classes have names. In the case of an anonymous class it is generated by the compiler. You can perform getClass().getName() in an anonymous class and get its name. You can use this name to access it via reflection. –  Peter Lawrey Jan 3 '11 at 19:17
1  
If you look at one of the above comments, you'll see the syntax requires the interface-name so that the compiler knows the anonomous object implements the interface. Its just part of the grammar of the language. –  Chad La Guardia Jan 5 '11 at 19:02
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Yes it is correct. you can do it with an inner class.

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Normaly, you can create a reference for an interface. But you cant create an instance for interface.

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We can declare in instance of Interface , then we can assign that instance to a class object which already has implemented that Interface. Decorator pattern theory code using System;

 class DecPattern {


interface IComponent {
string Operation( );
}

class Component : IComponent {
public string Operation ( ) {
return "I am walking ";
 }
}
class DecoratorA : IComponent {
IComponent component;
public DecoratorA (IComponent c) {
component = c;
}

public string Operation( ) {
string s = component.Operation( );
s += "and listening to Classic FM ";
return s;
}
}
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4  
This is a C# answer to a Java question. –  Luke Woodward Oct 27 '12 at 10:58
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Yes, your example is correct. Anonymous classes can implement interfaces, and that's the only time I can think of that you'll see a class implementing an interface without the "implements" keyword. Check out another code sample right here:

interface ProgrammerInterview  {

public void read();

}

class Website  {
ProgrammerInterview p = new ProgrammerInterview () {
public void read() {
System.out.println("interface ProgrammerInterview 
 class implementer");
}
};
}

This works fine. Was taken from this page:

http://www.programmerinterview.com/index.php/java-questions/anonymous-class-interface/

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