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These are the default Hibernate settings in Grails (found in conf/DataSource.groovy):

hibernate {
    cache.use_second_level_cache = true
    cache.use_query_cache = true
    cache.provider_class = 'net.sf.ehcache.hibernate.EhCacheProvider'
}

What are some good examples of circumstances under which one would like to:

  • disable the second level cache,
  • disable the query cache, or
  • change the default cache provider (EhCacheProvider)?
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In our project we are using the Datasources plug in to be able to connect to another database. This database is managed by another system, so we can't cache these classes because we don't have a way to know when they are updated, so for this datasource we disabled the second-level cache and the query cache. Just an example.

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It is difficult to give generic guidance on using cache as the best approach IMHO is always to build some metrics for the system and validate the effect cache has on those metrics.

I assume you realise that despite the above default settings in grails no queries or results are cached at all by default as cache is only used when explicitly enabled for specific queries/associations.

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mfloryan: I'm not really looking for general advice. I'm just trying to find a good example of when to tune the settings since I've never had the reason to do so myself :-) Have you ever tweaked those settings? –  knorv Jan 7 '11 at 12:40
    
Yes. One case when I did change it was when I knew I was not going to use any caching and didn't want the provider to create some temp files 'just in case'. The thing you are most likely to change anyway is the cache provider in case you need to distribute or scale your cache. –  mfloryan Jan 7 '11 at 20:41

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