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I'd like to find easier way to write loops inside loops.
Here is example code of 3 levels of 'for' loops:

int level = 0;
int value = 0;
bool next = false;

for (int i0 = 0; i0 < 6; i0++)
{
    level = 0;
    value = i0;
    method();
    if (next)
    for (int i1 = 0; i1 < 6; i1++)
        {
            level = 1;
            value = i1;
            method();
            if (next)
            for (int i2 = 0; i2 < 6; i2++)
                {
                    level = 2;
                    value = i2;
                    method();
                    if (next)
                    {
                        //Do somethnig
                    }   
                }
        }
}



private void method()
    {
        //use int 'level' and 'value'
        //determine bool 'next'
    }

I wonder if it's possible to write the same thing different way. To set number of levels(number of loops) and loop repeats. In this case levels = 3; repeats = 6;. I need it because I am using more than 20 loops inside themselves and than the code is not comprehensible.

I hope my explanation was ok and thanks for help.

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2  
Is method(); actually always the same call? Is recursion an option for this? –  Matthew Vines Jan 3 '11 at 19:49
    
One thing that might help make this easier to answer is if you can give some idea what the relationships between the levels of loops are. For example are you looping through the same thing each time? are you looping through consequential things? Unrelated things? Purple things? –  jaydel Jan 3 '11 at 19:52
    
You could at least give significant names to your ix. I bet that there are names for each of them. –  Jonas Jan 3 '11 at 20:00
    
Yes method(); is always the same call. –  cozzy Jan 3 '11 at 20:08
2  
when you go through the answers below, pay notice to how several answers change your method so that it takes both level and value as arguments and returns the next value. This essentially eliminates these variables as side-effects of the method and thus makes your code more transparent. –  stakx Jan 3 '11 at 20:28

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Instead of loop use recursive call:

void recursiveCall(int currentLevel)
{
 if (currentLevel == 0)
   return;

 for (int i0 = 0; i0 < 6; i0++)
 {
    level = 0;
    value = i0;
    method();
    if (next)
      recursiveCall(currentLevel - 1);
 }
}
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Go go gadget recursion!

public static void Loopy(int level, int maxLevel, int repeat)
{
    if (level > maxLevel)
        return;

    for (int i = 0; i < repeat; i++)
    {
        if (SomeMethod(level, i);)
            Loopy(level + 1, maxLevel, repeat);
    }
}

public static bool SomeMethod(int level, int i)
{
    Console.WriteLine("level: {0}, i: {1}", level, i);
    return ...
}
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1  
It's better to decrease levels, to have a better method signature, you can skip one input parameter (maxlevel, which is fix) like my answer. –  Saeed Amiri Jan 4 '11 at 5:53

You could use recursion in this case:

public void doLevel(int level)
{
  for (int i = 0; i < 6; i++)
  { 
     if(method(i, level))
       doLevel(level +1);
  }
}

private bool method(int value, int level)
{
    //use int 'level' and 'value'
    //determine bool 'next'
}
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Are you looking for backtracking? 20 inner loops seems a bit excessive for anything else...

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Yes, the definition of backtracking meets my demands perfectly. –  cozzy Jan 3 '11 at 19:59

Note that the following isn't a complete solution to what you asked. Also, a recursion-based solution is probably more appropriate. However, I'm posting this answer as a possible alternate way of thinking about the problem.

What you could do to get rid of the loops is to calculate the "cross product" of the values of i0, i1, and i2 as follows:

foreach (var i in from i0 in Enumerable.Range(0, 6)
                  from i1 in Enumerable.Range(0, 6)
                  from i2 in Enumerable.Range(0, 6)
                  select Tuple.Create(i0, i1, i2))
{
    // i is now a tuple containing any combination of i0, i1, and i2.
}

(If you need more levels, simply add another from .. in .. and expand the tuple by passing another argument to Tuple.Create.)

The tuples will arrive in this order:

[0, 0, 0] 
[0, 0, 1]
  . . . 
[0, 0, 5] 
[0, 1, 0] 
[0, 1, 1]
  . . . 
[0, 1, 5] 
[1, 0, 0] 
[1, 0, 1]
  . . .

i.e. the same order as with your nested for loops.

This half-solution however requires that you change the way your method() currently works, since calls to that method can't be made "in-between" the tuple components' generation. One possibility might be to derive both level and value from the current tuple i and pass them into method as arguments. next could become the return value of method:

foreach (var i in ...)
{
    bool next = method(level: ..., value: ...);
    ...
}

Again, this is not intended as a final solution, but as a possibility to change around your code.

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not very efficient but shorter is to use recursion which gets an array of counters as one parameter and the current level in the array as 2nd param.

then you can do something in the line of

paramsarray= array (4,5,6,3) ; //the depths of loops in each level
current_counts = array (0,0,0,0);

function loop (paramsarray, current_counts, depth){

if (depth> count(paramsarray) && ( index > paramsarray [depth])) return;// end recursion

// Do something here with current_counts as your current loop values

// 

current_counts[depth]++
if (current_counts[depth] > paramsarray[depth]) depth++
loop (paramsarray, current_counts, depth)
}
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