Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Here is an easy question (C# noob here) and I can't find how to do this (I have C# 4.0 reference from Schildt but not sure what I am looking for yet).

Say I have two objects created by two different classes, but have fields and/or methods with the same name. For example:

public class Object1 {
  bool enable;
  public void Reset(){
    enable = false;
  }
}

public class Object2 {
  bool enable;
  public void Reset(){
    enable = false;
  }
}

Objects are very dissimilar, justifying the creation of two different objects. However, I have many objects with the common 'enable' field and 'Reset()' method.

So here is what I would like to do (in pseudocode or whatever this is):

void Manipulate(ref object pObj){
  (pObj).enable = true;
  (pObj).Reset();
}

void Main(){
  Manipulate(obj1);
  Manipulate(obj2);
}

How can I do this? I am not sure how to create an object that can point to objects from different classes.

Thanks!


Thanks to all the answers. I went through interfaces and understood them as an 'alias' and couldn't figure out what was the usefulness of them.

share|improve this question
    
Whatever you do, get a new book. Almost any book is better than Schildt. His reputation for awfulness is second to none. For example, I recommend Essential C# 4.0: amazon.com/Essential-4-0-Microsoft-NET-Development/dp/… –  Jason Jan 3 '11 at 20:35
    
Thanks for the pointer on the book. Schildt is the second book I try and still some concepts don't get in my brain. For example, I completely missed the point of interfaces. –  PaulG Jan 3 '11 at 21:56

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This is what interfaces are for:

public interface ICanResetAndEnable
{
    // Note: interfaces cannot have fields, only properties and methods.
    bool Enable { get; set; }
    void Reset();
}

public class Object1 : ICanResetAndEnable {
  bool Enable { get; set; }
  public void Reset(){
    Enable = false;
  }
}

public class Object2 : ICanResetAndEnable {
  bool Enable { get; set; }
  public void Reset(){
    Enable = false;
  }
}

You then define your Manipulate method to accept a parameter of any type that implements this interface:

void Manipulate(ICanResetAndEnable obj)
{
    // Do whatever.
}
share|improve this answer

Given that you are using .NET 4.0 you can simply declare your variable as dynamic and use late binding to access the method.

dynamic myvar = GetTheObjectFromSomewhere();
myVar.Enable = true;
myVar.Reset();
share|improve this answer
    
+1 to counteract the downvote. While I'd recommend interfaces, this is a valid solution. –  TrueWill Jan 3 '11 at 20:37
    
Sure I get that this can be abused. But used properly this is pretty elegant and simple and can be used with existing designs without major refactoring. –  Tim Jarvis Jan 3 '11 at 20:40
    
This is an interesting solution. I thought of this, but was afraid of runtime errors. Does the compiler check all the possible objects that can get assigned to 'myvar' or do I have to catch an exception if the wrong object gets in there? –  PaulG Jan 3 '11 at 21:58
    
You would need to catch an exception if the object instace did not match the method/property signature. Still, in certain circumstances (where you are controling what gets passed) its quite an elegant solution. Kinda along the lines of RoR's concept of "convention over configuration" –  Tim Jarvis Jan 3 '11 at 22:04

Just use a common interface that Object1 and Object2 both implement.

public interface InterfaceA {
  bool Enable { get; set; }
  void Reset();
}

public class Object1 : InterfaceA {
  public bool Enable { get; set; }
  public void Reset(){
    Enable = false;
  }
}

public class Object2 : InterfaceA {
  public bool Enable { get; set; }
  public void Reset(){
    Enable = false;
  }
}

void Manipulate(InterfaceA pObj){
  pObj.Enable = true;
  pObj.Reset();
}

void Main(){
  Manipulate(obj1);
  Manipulate(obj2);
}

Note: I've changed your public attribute for a public automatic property - because interfaces cannot have data members and works the same. Besides, it is also better practice to use properties...

share|improve this answer

You want to do something like this:

public interface IEnableable {
    bool Enable { get; set; }
}

public interface IResettable {
    void Reset();
}

public interface IEnableableAndResettable : IEnableable, IResettable { }

What this is doing is abstracting the operations that you want to be able to perform on your objects. Then you can make the method Manipulate eat objects that conform to this abstraction.

public class Object1 : IEnableableAndResettable {
    public bool Enable { get; set; }
    public void Reset() {
        this.Enable = false;
    }
    // details
}

public class Object2 : IEnableableAndResettable {
    public bool Enable { get; set; }
    public void Reset() {
        this.Enable = false;
    }
    // details
}

Then:

void Manipulate(IEnableableAndResettable enableableAndResettable){
    enableableAndResettable.Enable = true;
    enableableAndResettable.Reset();
}

You could even consider giving Object1 and Object2 a common base:

public class Enableable : IEnableableAndResettable {
    public bool Enable { get; set; }
    public void Reset() { this.Enable = false; }
}

public class Object1 : Enableable { }
public class Object2 : Enableable { }
share|improve this answer
1  
I like the separation of interfaces. Thanks for the insight on this! –  PaulG Jan 3 '11 at 21:59

I would do an Interface or an base class for all objects that share the method Reset();

Interface:

public interface IResetable
{
    void Rest();
}

public class ClassA : IResetable
{
    bool Enable = true;
    public void Reset()
    {
      Enable = false;
    }
}

void Manipulate(IResetable obj){
    obj.Reset();
}

..Or Base Class:

public class BaseResetClass 
{
    internal bool Enable = true;
    public void Reset()
    {
      Enable = false;
    }
}

public class ClassA : BaseResetClass 
{

}
public class ClassB : BaseResetClass 
{

}


var ca = new ClassA();
ca.Reset();

var ca2 = new ClassB();
ca2.Reset();
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.