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What is the VB.NET equivalent of this C# code (convert an ASCII string to hexadecimal)?

public static string AsciiToHex(string asciiString)
{
    string hex = "";

    StringBuilder sBuffer = new StringBuilder();
    for (int i = 0; i < asciiString.Length; i++)
    {
        sBuffer.Append(Convert.ToInt32(asciiString[i]).ToString("x"));
    }
    hex = sBuffer.ToString().ToUpper();

    return hex;
}
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developerfusion.com/tools/convert/csharp-to-vb Allows you to convert C# to VB.net. –  user389823 Jan 3 '11 at 21:26
1  
You do realize that that the number of digits is variable, right? –  Mehrdad Jan 3 '11 at 21:26

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

A few things:

  1. Why use a for loop where a foreach look also works? (The answer is: not)
  2. The ToUpper is redundant when we choose the correct formatting flag (X).
  3. The variable hex is useless.
  4. Convert.ToInt32 can be shortened to (int).
  5. The name “ASCII” is actually wrong – you are working with Unicode here.
  6. Usually, this calls for a padding since the ToString("x") result has variable length: for character codes < 16 it yields a single character!

This leaves us with:

public static string CharToHex(string str) {
    StringBuilder buffer = new StringBuilder();
    foreach (char c in str)
        buffer.AppendFormat("{0:X2}", (int) c);
    return buffer.ToString();
}

… and translated into VB:

Public Shared Function CharToHex(ByVal str As String) As String
    Dim buffer As New StringBuilder()

    For Each c As Char in str
        buffer.AppendFormat("{0:X2}", Asc(c))
    End For

    Return buffer.ToString()
End Function
share|improve this answer
    
Very clean solution! –  user389823 Jan 3 '11 at 21:32
Public Shared Function AsciiToHex(asciiString As String) As String
 Dim hex As String = ""
 Dim sBuffer As New StringBuilder()
 For i As Integer = 0 To asciiString.Length - 1
  sBuffer.Append(Convert.ToInt32(asciiString(i)).ToString("x"))
 Next
 hex = sBuffer.ToString().ToUpper()
 Return hex
End Function

via http://www.developerfusion.com/tools/convert/csharp-to-vb/

Which is one of many tools that can do C# to VB conversions, and can by found using this search: http://www.bing.com/search?q=c%23+to+vb+converter&src=IE-SearchBox&FORM=IE8SRC

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Instead of Convert.ToInt32 I would use AscW –  Konrad Rudolph Jan 3 '11 at 21:25
    
Darn you, the captcha slowed me down. –  Cyclone Jan 3 '11 at 21:25
    
+1, same to you ;-) –  Cyclone Jan 3 '11 at 21:27
    
@Konrad: Is there a particular reason that you'd use a VB-specific "pseudofunction" (for lack of a better term) rather than a CLS-compliant function that will be clearer to anyone else reading the code? I'm not saying that it's a bad idea per se, just that I try to get people to use library functions if there's no particular advantage to the language-specific construct. –  Adam Robinson Jan 3 '11 at 21:28
    
@Adam: usually I always favour the framework functions but I hate the Convert class with a fiery passion. These “everything goes” functions that perform just about any conversion even if they are not meaningful is just dangerous. Therefore I look on such calls in code as a warning sign (and I wouldn’t use it in the C# code, either) because it’s simply not obvious which conversion is going on. Furthermore, the existence of this static helper class is pure code smell. Using it is no better than using un-OOP “free” functions. –  Konrad Rudolph Jan 3 '11 at 21:33
Public Shared Function AsciiToHex(asciiString As String) As String
 Dim hex As String = ""

 Dim sBuffer As New StringBuilder()
 For i As Integer = 0 To asciiString.Length - 1
  sBuffer.Append(Convert.ToInt32(asciiString(i)).ToString("x"))
 Next
 hex = sBuffer.ToString().ToUpper()

 Return hex
End Function

http://www.developerfusion.com/tools/convert/csharp-to-vb/

share|improve this answer
    
+1. I like your answer. ;-) –  David Stratton Jan 3 '11 at 21:26

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