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I am inserting data from perl in my sqlite database.

here is my coding:

how do i make this case work if my values have special characters like quotes?

sub ADDROWDATATODATABASE
{
    my $dbh1 = $_[0];
    my $table = $_[1];
    my @DATA = @{$_[2]};
    my $string = ();
    foreach (@DATA) { $string .= "'$_',"; } $string =~ s/,$//; 

    $dbh1->do(qq|insert into $table values(NULL,$string);|); 

    my $date = `date`;
    print "[MYSQLITE_ADDROW.pl] $date : ADDING DATA INTO DATABASE <p>";
}
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Is this MySQL, or SQLite? –  Larry Lustig Jan 3 '11 at 21:27
    
this is sqlite, does it make a difference? –  Gordon Jan 4 '11 at 12:53
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2 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Use placeholders and bind values. This will keep your program safer from SQL injection, too.

my $statement = $dbh->prepare("insert into $table VALUES(NULL, ?,?,?,?)");
$statement->execute(@DATA);

Assuming that the number of elements in @DATA is only known at runtime (and that it is the correct number of elements for $table), you can use

my $statement = $dbh->prepare("insert into $table VALUES(NULL" . ",?"x@DATA . ")";
$statement->execute(@DATA);

to make sure that the statement has the right number of placeholders.

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it works great! many thanks –  Gordon Jan 4 '11 at 13:19
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You need to call a function to "escape" the values. How you do that depends on what database you're actually using — MySQL and SQLite are different products.

Also, you should explicitly name the columns in the INSERT statement:

INSERT INTO Table (Col1, Col2) VALUES (Val1, Val2)
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