Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Consider:

template < typename Something >
boost::function<void()> f()
{
  typedef typename Something::what type;
  return [](){};
}

In this code you need the typename because 'what' is a dependent name. But consider this:

template < typename Something >
boost::function<void()> f()
{
  return []()
  { 
    typedef typename Something::what type;
  };
}

Compiler bitches: "typename cannot be used outside a template declaration"

WTF?

THIS works:

template < typename Something >
boost::function<void()> f()
{
  return []()
  { 
    typedef Something::what type;
  };
}

What is it about the creation of a lambda that means "what" is not a dependent name anymore? Or is this just a bug?

Heh...correction. The latter doesn't work. It says that "Something" doesn't exist. This modified version DOES work though and still unintuitively doesn't need and won't accept "typename".

template < typename T > struct wtf { typedef typename T::what type; };

template < typename Something >
boost::function<void()> f()
{
  return []() { typedef wtf<Something>::type type; };
}

Of course, now I have TWO questions: the original and, WTF doesn't it find "Something" unless it's used as a template parameter??

share|improve this question
    
Which compiler are you using? –  sbi Jan 3 '11 at 22:48
    
VS2010 ..................... –  Crazy Eddie Jan 3 '11 at 23:00
    
Your second example compiles fine in g++ 4.6 –  AraK Jan 3 '11 at 23:28
    
I've added C++ tag so we get syntax highlighting this is needed due to this change –  Motti Jan 4 '11 at 8:14
    
In C++0x, typename is allowed outside of templates and on non-dependent names, as long as they are qualified. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Jan 4 '11 at 16:41
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

That's a very interesting question. From my understanding, the first 'WTF' (the one with typename in the lambda body) should be the correct according to N3225 5.1.2/7 :

The lambda-expression’s compound-statement yields the function-body of the function call operator, but for purposes of name lookup, determining the type and value of this and transforming id-expressions referring to non-static class members into class member access expressions using (*this), the compound-statement is considered in the context of the lambda-expression.

As Something is a dependent-name in the context of the lambda expression, it should also be a dependent name in the context of the lambda function body according to this quote.

share|improve this answer
2  
OK, I asked in comp.std.c++ and the gist of it is: Icecrime is right, Motti is wrong. MSVC's single-pass compilation of templates is non-standard and is likely culprit. So you get the kudos. I was pretty sure you where but I wanted to check. –  Crazy Eddie Jan 11 '11 at 18:08
add comment

It's because the lambda is actually a class defined by the compiler, it doesn't share the template arguments of the outer function, the lambda type is defined when the template is instantiated so the template argument is no longer dependant and typename isn't needed.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.