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I have the following lines of PHP code in my file along with some other code:

$command = "INSERT INTO inventory_items (Index, Name, Price) VALUES (NULL, 'Diamond', '3.99')";
$insertion = mysql_query($command) or die(mysql_error());
if ($insertion == FALSE)
{
 echo "Error: Insert failed.";
}
else
{
 echo "Insert successful.";
}

It keeps returning this error:

You have an error in your SQL syntax; check the manual that corresponds to your MySQL server version for the right syntax to use near 'Index, Name, Price) VALUES (NULL, 'Diamond', '3.99')' at line 1

myAdmin says I am using MySQL client version 5.0.91. What am I doing wrong? I just can't figure it out! I tried searching a lot...

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Did any of the answers here solve your problem? –  Alex Vidal Jan 4 '11 at 21:17
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3 Answers

Index is a reserved word in MySQL and as such, you need to either change the name of the column, or escape it with backticks. Try this $command:

$command = "INSERT INTO inventory_items (`Index`, Name, Price) VALUES (NULL, 'Diamond', '3.99')";

Read more about reserved words here: http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/reserved-words.html

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I don't see "db" on that list, but I ran into the same problem as the OP. I eventually changed my table name to "dbentry" and it worked. So, is there an additional reserved list I don't know about or was I doing something else wrong? –  Bryan Jan 3 '11 at 23:45
    
@Bryan: If all you changed was your table name, then I guess db is another reserved word. Not sure if there's another list other than that one though. –  Alex Vidal Jan 3 '11 at 23:47
    
As a general rule you should always enclose column names and table names with backticks. If a future version of (my)SQL introduces a new reserved word your once working query may fail. –  DeveloperChris Jan 4 '11 at 0:45
    
@DeveloperChris: I agree. That actually happened to me a few years ago. I can't recall the column name, but I believe it was actually date or id –  Alex Vidal Jan 4 '11 at 3:52
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Try this:

$command = "INSERT INTO inventory_items (`Index`, Name, Price) VALUES (NULL, 'Diamond', '3.99');";

MySQL reserved words and how to treat them.

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I have tried as you have said but have gotten the same error: You have an error in your SQL syntax; check the manual that corresponds to your MySQL server version for the right syntax to use near '@Index, Name, Price) VALUES (NULL, 'Diamond', '3.99')' at line 1 –  user561912 Jan 3 '11 at 23:42
    
It's not @ but Index instead. –  Leniel Macaferi Jan 3 '11 at 23:43
    
Oh, I'm sorry it DID work! THANKS! –  user561912 Jan 3 '11 at 23:44
    
yeeeeeeeeah thanks brother :D:D:D so...whats up with the weird quotations? –  user561912 Jan 3 '11 at 23:44
1  
because its a reserved word? –  user561912 Jan 3 '11 at 23:49
show 5 more comments

Can you verify that the columns in your inventory_items table are:

Index
Name
Price

And that you have the Index field set to AUTO_INCREMENT.

The best thing is probably to remove that field from your insert statement.

Try

$command = "INSERT INTO inventory_items (Name, Price) VALUES ('Diamond', '3.99')";

Since you're not inserting an Index anyway.

Hope that helps!

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