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I want to check if it has been an hour since the last datetime stamp in MySQL. How can I do this using PHP?

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I always prefer to store a UNIX_TIMESTAMP for my database as its easier to manipulate within php side of things. –  RobertPitt Jan 4 '11 at 2:09
1  
@RobertPitt - using UNIX_TIMESTAMP is not recommended. –  mauris Jan 4 '11 at 2:10
    
@RobertPitt You will have trouble using DATE_SUB and its friends, I believe. –  alex Jan 4 '11 at 2:12
    
It also makes ad-hoc queries harder. –  staticsan Jan 4 '11 at 2:16
    
This is where FROM_UNIXTIME(unix_timestamp,format) comes in :), I also said that I prefer to store a unix timestamp –  RobertPitt Jan 4 '11 at 2:21

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The cleanest way to do this is in MySQL using DATE_SUB (or DATE_ADD depending on your goals). For example:

SELECT DATE_SUB(NOW(), INTERVAL 1 HOUR)

Likewise you can replace "1 HOUR" with other things like "1 DAY" or "1 MINUTE" and so on. I always prefer to do date comparisons at the database level since presumably the dates are being stored in a common format and GMT offset.

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you could and probably should do this entire thing in mysql instead

http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.5/en/date-and-time-functions.html

you can find the difference between a datetime field and the current time using your query, and return the result as a row.

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I didn't know you can do this, that's why I chose PHP. –  Strawberry Jan 4 '11 at 2:26
    
So I would use Use TIMEDIFF( CURTIME() , $dbDateTime ) right? Could I get an example? –  Strawberry Jan 4 '11 at 2:30
    
you seem to still be using a php variable? you pull the db datetime field directly out of the database. something like SELECT TIMEDIFF(CURTIME(), name_of_datetime_field) AS time_diff FROM table_name WHERE id = blah LIMIT 1 or some such. you would pull it in the same query that you were getting your datetime value out of the database to begin with. –  dqhendricks Jan 4 '11 at 2:39

This link explains about date_diff for PHP >= 5.3 and some work around solutions for older version.

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$db_time = strtotime($row->timestamp_col);
$age = 60 * 60;
if ($db_time < (time() - $age)) {
    doSomething();
}

This is unnecessarily broken down so you can see how it works.

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$now = time();

$dbDate = strtotime($row['datetime']);

if ($now > $dbDate + 3600) {
   // yes
}
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You put the check into the query. Then you can use a MySQL date comparison and the PHP doesn't have to know or care.

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