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Still plugging away at teaching myself Perl. I'm trying to write some code that will count the lines of a file that contain double letters and then place parentheses around those double letters.

Now what I've come up with will find the first occurrence of double letters, but not any other ones. For instance, if the line is:

Amp, James Watt, Bob Transformer, etc. These pioneers conducted many

My code will render this:

19 Amp, James Wa(tt), Bob Transformer, etc. These pioneers conducted many

The "19" is the count (of lines containing double letters) and it gets the "tt" of "Watt" but misses the "ee" in "pioneers".

Below is my code:

$file = '/path/to/file/electricity.txt';        
open(FH, $file) || die "Cannot open the file\n";        

my $counter=0;

while (<FH>) {
    chomp();
    if (/(\w)\1/) {
        $counter += 1;
        s/$&/\($&\)/g;
        print "\n\n$counter $_\n\n";
    } else {
        print "$_\n";
    }
}

close(FH);          

What am I overlooking?

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4 Answers

use strict;
use warnings;
use 5.010;
use autodie;

my $file = '/path/to/file/electricity.txt';        
open my $fh, '<', $file;        

my $counter = 0;

while (<$fh>) {
    chomp;
    if (/(\w)\1/) {
        $counter++;
        s/
          (?<full>
               (?<letter>\p{L})
               \g{letter}
          )
        /($+{full})/xg;
        $_ = $counter . ' ' . $_;
    }
    say;
}

You are overlooking a few things. strict and warnings; 5.010 (or higher!) for say; autodie so you don't have to keep typing those 'or die'; Lexical filehandles and the three-argument form of open; A bit nitpicky, but knowing when (not) to use parens for function calls; Understanding why you shouldn't use $&; The autoincrement operator..

But on the regex part specifically, $& is only set on matches (m//), not substitution Actually no, ysth is right as usual. Sorry!

(I took the liberty of modifying your regex a bit; it makes use of named captures - (?) instead of bare parens, accessed through \g{} notation inside the regex, and the %+ hash outside of it - and Unicode-style properties - \p{Etc}). A lot more about those in perlre and perluniprops, respectively.

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2  
$& most certainly is set on substitution –  ysth Jan 4 '11 at 4:24
    
..and that's what I get for running my mouth like a turd. I have no idea why $& is doing what it does, then. I tried this: C:\>perl -E "use re 'eval'; $_ = q!Amp, James Watt, Bob Transformer, etc. These pioneers conducted many!; /(\w)\1/; say qq!pre[$&] !; s/(?{ print qq!preinter[$&] ! })$&(?{ print qq!postinter[$&] ! })/say qq!subst[$&] !; qq!($&)!/eg; say qq!post[$&] !; say" But I'm now more baffled than before. –  Hugmeir Jan 4 '11 at 4:42
    
Good answer, but the syntax/use of named regexes might be too complicated for someone just learning perl, i've been programming in perl for 2 years and have never come across them :P –  Charles Ma Jan 4 '11 at 7:21
    
+1 for $& warning. Don't do it, kids! –  Philip Potter Jan 4 '11 at 8:47
1  
@Charles Just because you've never come across named captures doesn't make them complicated. At worst they have a slightly confusing syntax, which can be tidied with /x and good use of whitespace. But their real power is that they make subsequent code far less cryptic, and make regexes robust to addition or subtraction of capture groups at a later date. –  Philip Potter Jan 4 '11 at 8:49
show 6 more comments

You need to use a back reference:

#! /usr/bin/env perl

use warnings;
use strict;

my $line = "this is a doubble letter test of my scrippt";

$line =~ s/([[:alpha:]])(\1)/($1$2)/g;

print "$line\n";

And now the test.

$ ./test.pl
this is a dou(bb)le le(tt)er test of my scri(pp)t

It works!

When you do a substitution, you use the $1 to represent what is in the parentheses. When you are referring to a part of the regular expression itself, you use the \1 form.

The [[:alpha:]] is a special POSIX class. You can find out more information by typing in

$ perldoc perlre

at the command line.

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You're overcomplicating things by messing around with $&. s///g returns the number of substitutions performed when used in scalar context, so you can do it all in one shot without needing to count matches by hand or track the position of each match:

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;

my $text = 'James Watt, a pioneer of wattage engineering';

my $doubles = $text =~ s/(\w)\1/($1$1)/g;

print "$doubles $text\n";

Output:

4 James Wa(tt), a pion(ee)r of wa(tt)age engin(ee)ring

Edit: OP stated in comments that the exercise in question says not to use =~, so here's a non-regex-based solution, since all regex matches use =~ (implicitly or explicitly):

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;

my $text = 'James Watt, a pioneer of wattage engineering';

my $doubles = 0;
for my $i (reverse 1 .. length $text) {
    if (substr($text, $i, 1) eq substr($text, $i - 1, 1)) {
        $doubles++;
        substr($text, $i - 1, 2) = '(' . substr($text, $i - 1, 2) . ')';
    }
}

print "$doubles $text\n";
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Thanks! BTW, I'm using comp.leeds.ac.uk/Perl as a tutorial and the tutorial asks that a solution explicitly not use =~ match operator but instead use $_. So that requirement lead me down the dead-end path I ended up on. –  phileas fogg Jan 4 '11 at 19:45
    
@phileas fogg: if (/(\w)\1/) is just shorthand for if ($_ =~ /(\w)\1/), so your version is still using =~ implicitly even if you don't actually see it on your screen. I suspect that this limitation was intended to get you to write a solution using the substr function instead of a regex, so I'll edit one into my answer. (Or maybe my suspicion is wrong... Can you give a link to the specific exercise? I don't seem to be able to find it.) –  Dave Sherohman Jan 5 '11 at 9:27
    
This is the sensible answer. –  ekerner Sep 16 '12 at 14:26
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The problem is that you're using $& in the second regex which only matched the first occurance of a double letter set

 if (/(\w)\1/) { #first occurance matched, so the pattern in the replace regex will only be that particular set of double letters

Try doing something like this: s/(\w)\1/\($1$1\)/g; instead of s/$&/\($&\)/g; Full code after editing:

$file = '/path/to/file/electricity.txt';        
open(FH, $file) || die "Cannot open the file\n";        

my $counter=0;

while (<FH>) {
    chomp();
    if (s/(\w)\1/\($1$1\)/g) {
        $counter++;
        print "\n\n$counter $_\n\n";
    } else {
        print "$_\n";
    }
}

close(FH);   

notice that you can use the s///g replace in a conditional statement which is true when a replace occurred.

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I tried that originally and got a bunch of "uninitialized use of $1 in line x" warnings. –  phileas fogg Jan 4 '11 at 3:00
    
which version of perl are you using? –  Charles Ma Jan 4 '11 at 7:17
    
Actually what I tried was the same code as I wrote above but used "$1" instead of $&. This resulted in the warnings and it also grabbed the first instance of a double letter and then substituted "()" in all subsequent appearances of that letter in the line. –  phileas fogg Jan 4 '11 at 19:41
    
I see, edited with the full code so you know where the regex is supposed to go :) –  Charles Ma Jan 4 '11 at 21:11
    
Thanks! That really does clear things up. –  phileas fogg Jan 5 '11 at 2:21
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