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marked as duplicate by nawfal, Ondrej Janacek, Mansfield, JMK, rene Dec 19 '13 at 22:07

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You can declare structs const. Classes and structs are interchangeable, and it works for classes. –  templatetypedef Jan 4 '11 at 5:07
    
@templatetypedef: Shall I mention "other than null". –  Lazlo Jan 4 '11 at 5:12
    
@templatetypedef: I'm not sure what version of C# you're using, but that's not true on any version I've seen. –  cdhowie Jan 4 '11 at 5:12
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@temp C# != C++ –  LeakyCode Jan 4 '11 at 5:12
    
D'oh! I completely misread that. Sorry! –  templatetypedef Jan 4 '11 at 5:15
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4 Answers

up vote 17 down vote accepted

Because the value type constructor might do anything -- for example, switch logic based on the time of day. Constant value types makes sense intellectually, but it simply cannot work on custom value types in practice due to the flexibility of constructors to do whatever they please. (Remember that constants are evaluated at compile time, which means your constructor would have to be run at compile time.)

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Thanks, will accept when S/O lets me. Too bad, I have a "legit" constructor if I may say, and I'd love having it const. But oh well, I'll find another design I guess. –  Lazlo Jan 4 '11 at 5:13
    
@Lazlo: Even still, the compiler would have to call it while it's compiling. But the compiler isn't technically supposed to run your code. –  cdhowie Jan 4 '11 at 5:15
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I guess I'm looking for the equivalent of C++'s aggregate or POD structs: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C%2B%2B_classes Something that is just a different value type or group of data. Oh well. –  Lazlo Jan 4 '11 at 5:18
    
Structs can be created without a constructor. Code which has access to a struct's fields can simply populate them with the desired value; a compiler which had a list of fields and values could create a struct instance which was suitably configured. –  supercat Jan 27 '13 at 4:33
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@cdhowie: The issue would not be one of performance so much as semantics, as const values can be used in cases where static read-only fields cannot (e.g. as default parameter values). They are also "baked into" compiled code, which in some cases is a bad thing but in other cases may be useful. –  supercat Jan 28 '13 at 16:29
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For the C# compiler to produce a const value of a structure type it must know what values should go in all its fields. The C# compiler intrinsically knows how to initialize the fields of certain types like Decimal, but for most value types it has no such knowledge.

It would be possible for a compiler to provide a means of declaring constant values of a structure type in contexts where all of the struct fields were exposed. If a structure's fields were private, constants of that type could then be declared only within the structure; if the fields were internal, constants could be declared anywhere within the assembly; if public, they could be declared anywhere.

Although I would like to see such a feature, I do not expect any mainstream .net languages to implement it. Named constants of types the compiler inherently knows about can participate in other constant expressions, whereas static readonly variables cannot. If NumRows is a constant equal to 4, an expression like Arr[3*NumRows+7]can be replaced byArr[19]even ifNumRows` is defined in an outside assembly. This gives such constants a substantial advantage over static read-only variables. If, however, a constant is of a type that a compiler does not intrinsically recognize, it would have very limited ability to participate in any constant expressions, effectively negating the advantage of its being a constant in the first place. If a value-type constant had an exposed field, it would be possible for a compiler to use the value of that field as a constant, but since the creators of .net languages are philosophically opposed to structures with exposed fields, I would not expect them to allow such usage even if they could.

There would be some potential use cases for favoring constants over static readonly variables, but many such cases can be handled acceptably using existing types. For example, a library might expose a const Int64 to encode information about its version, and use that value as a default parameter value for a GetLinkedVersionInfo method. The value in question would get "baked into" the calling code when it was compiled, thus allowing the method to report what version of the library the caller was linked with, and possibly identify whether there are any compatibility problems with the version it's running.

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I just tested the readonly keyword with a simple mutable struct:

struct Test
{
   public int value;

   public void setInt(int val)
   {
      value = val;
   }
}

static class Program
{
   public static readonly Test t = new Test();

   static void Main()
   {
      Console.WriteLine(t.value); // Outputs "0"
      t.setInt(10);
      //t.value = 10;  //Illegal, will not let you assign field of a static struct
      Console.WriteLine(t.value); // Still outputs "0"
   }
}

Even though a readonly struct isn't technicly a compile time constant, the runtime wont let it change. Even stepping threw the setInt() method it looks like value changes, but does not show the change in Main.

I guess the struct itself is placed in "readonly" memory, disallowing them to change. Unlike a class, which just keeps the pointer constant, allowing the class fields themselves to change as they wish.

So it appears static readonly is effectivly a const, even for mutable structs.

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All instance methods, properties, and events on a struct receive a reference to the struct on which they should operate--equivalent to receiving this as a ref parameter--but for an annoying quirk in vb.net and C#: if a struct method or property is invoked on a read-only struct instance, the compiler will silently make a copy of that instance and pass that to the code in question. This yields slow but correct semantics in cases where the code does not modify the structure, and broken semantics in cases where the code does modify the structure. I wish Microsoft would define an attribute... –  supercat Jan 24 '13 at 22:48
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...that would allow struct properties and methods to indicate whether they affect the passed-in method, so that the compiler could allow methods that don't modify this to be used on read-only structs but forbid the use of methods that do. Otherwise, your best bet is to put up with the annoying and ugly syntax public static void setInt(ref Test it, int val) {it.value = val;} and Test.setInt(ref t, 10); which would correctly squawk if you tried it on a read-only variable t. –  supercat Jan 24 '13 at 22:51
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Const in C# means it can be determined at compile time, which is why only very primitive types such as int and string can be a const.

If you are coming from a C background, the readonly keyword might better suit you.

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This is the real answer for programmers with C/C++ background. –  Eonil Jul 31 '13 at 3:42
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