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I did several Boolean Comparisons:

>>> (True or False) is True
True
>>> (True or False) == True
True

It sounds like == and is are interchangeable for Boolean-values.

Sometimes it's more clear to use is

I want to know that:

Are True and False pre-allocated in python?

Is bool(var) always return the same True(or False) with the pre-allocated True(or False)?

Is it safe to replace == with is to compare Boolean-values?


It's not about Best-Practice.

I just want to know the Truth.

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2  
Stop randomly highlighting words. It's pointless and makes it harder to understand. –  Glenn Maynard Jan 4 '11 at 6:42
    
@Glenn Maynard, Much better now. Thank you for your advice. –  kev Jan 4 '11 at 6:54
2  
"The truth? You can't handle the truth." –  S.Lott Jan 4 '11 at 11:27

6 Answers 6

up vote 15 down vote accepted

You shouldn't ever need to compare booleans. If you are doing something like:

if(some_bool == True):
  ...

...just change it to:

if(some_bool):
  ...

No is or == needed.

Added: okay, if it's simply about knowing more about the internals: there should only ever be two boolean literal objects (see also the C API), and bool(x) is True should be True if bool(x) == True for any Python program. This does not mean that x is True if x == True, however (eg. x = 1).

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Why was this down-voted? –  Matthew Flaschen Jan 4 '11 at 6:26
    
@Matthew Flaschen - Probably because, strictly speaking, it doesn't answer the question... –  detly Jan 4 '11 at 6:27
    
@detly, none of the answers really did. Even kevpie's didn't address whether True and False were the only instances, or really have any documentation. Yours is probably the most practical. –  Matthew Flaschen Jan 4 '11 at 6:38
    
@Matthew @detly: Sorry, on reflection I should not have down-voted but merely left a comment. It seems most people imagine "True == True" as a stand-in for "<my expression> == True", and in this case we should just write "<my expression>" as suggested. But this misses the (in my opinion obvious) possibility that "True == True" is actually a stand-in for "<my first expression> == <my second expression>", which is a perfectly valid thing to write. I can't undo my downvote anymore. Nevertheless I still feel the original (unedited) answer was bad. –  Mitch Schwartz Jan 4 '11 at 6:47
    
@Mitch Schwartz - okay, that makes things clearer. By the way, you should be able to reverse a downvote shortly after an answer is edited, but if not, no big deal. –  detly Jan 4 '11 at 6:52

Watch out for what else you may be comparing.

>>> 1 == True
True
>>> 1 is True
False

True and False will have stable object ids for their lifetime in your python instance.

>>> id(True)
4296106928
>>> id(True)
4296106928

is compares the id of an object

EDIT: adding or

Since OP is using or in question it may be worth pointing this out.

or that evaluates True: returns the first 'True' object.

>>> 1 or True
1
>>> 'a' or True
'a'
>>> True or 1
True

or that evaluates False: returns the last 'False' object

>>> False or ''
''
>>> '' or False
False

and that evaluates to True: returns the last 'True' object

>>> True and 1
1
>>> 1 and True
True

and that evaluates to False: returns the first 'False' object

>>> '' and False
''
>>> False and ''
False

This is an important python idiom and it allows concise and compact code for dealing with boolean logic over regular python objects.

>>> bool([])
False
>>> bool([0])
True
>>> bool({})
False
>>> bool({False: False})
True
>>> bool(0)
False
>>> bool(-1)
True
>>> bool('False')
True
>>> bool('')
False

Basically 'empty' objects are False, 'non empty' are True.

Combining this with @detly's and the other answers should provide some insight into how to use if and bools in python.

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bool(1) is True ==> True –  kev Jan 4 '11 at 6:23
2  
right. bool(1) ==> True so bool(1) is True ==> True. is should be used when you must have the same instance of an object. –  kevpie Jan 4 '11 at 6:26

Yes. There are guaranteed to be exactly two bools, True and False:

Class bool cannot be subclassed further. Its only instances are False and True.

That means if you know both operands are bool, == and is are equivalent. However, as detly notes, there's usually no reason to use either in this case.

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== and is are both comparison operators, which would return a boolean value - True or False. True has a numeric value of 1 and False has a numeric value of 0.

The operator == compare the values of two objects and objects compared are most often are the same types (int vs int, float vs float), If you compare objects of different types, then they are unequal. The operator is tests for object identity, 'x is y' is true if both x and y have the same id. That is, they are same objects.

So, when you are comparing if you comparing the return values of same type, use == and if you are comparing if two objects are same (be it boolean or anything else), you can use is.

42 is 42 is True and is same as 42 == 42.

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1  
Your last assertion is false. 42 is 42 is True and is NOT same as 42 == 42. is is for identity comparison and it just happens that sometimes two numbers have the same id (for optimization reasons). Test this: 256 is (255+1) == True and 256 is (255+1) == False (that limit may differ between python versions). –  ivanalejandro0 Jan 22 at 19:10
    
Thanks for your comment. But confused a bit by your last expression (256 is (255+1)) == True ; returns true –  Senthil Kumaran Jan 22 at 20:57
    
Well, I think that in your case may apply the "(that limit may differ between python versions)". If you test with bigger numbers you will get False at some point, the identity equality among numbers is related to a python optimization... Here: stackoverflow.com/a/306353/687989 is an explanation about that issue. –  ivanalejandro0 Feb 3 at 1:07

It seems that all answers deal with True and False as defined after an interpreter startup. Before booleans became part of Python they were often defined as part of a program. Even now (Python 2.6.6) they are only names that can be pointed to different objects:

>>> True = 1
>>> (2 > 1)
True
>>> (2 > 1) == True
True
>>> (2 > 1) is True
False

If you have to deal with older software, be aware of that.

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