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The dilemma: a Linux program that I'm working on should:

  1. Fetch a "package" over git+ssh:// protocol (using Git).
  2. Install that "package" in the system.

For git+ssh to work, Git needs to see my keys.

For the "package" installation, the program must have superuser privileges.

A limitation: the program should not elevate privileges (call sudo) by itself. User must explicitly invoke it with sudo. (Lets ignore the case when user runs the program while begin logged in as root — assuming he will setup keys correctly then.)

So, the question is: how to do ssh access with user keys from the program that is invoked with sudo?

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Why the close vote? –  Alexander Gladysh Jan 4 '11 at 9:33
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

use the -i identity_file ssh parameters. To tell git to use the proper command you should set the GIT_SSH variable to a file that will call ssh -i "$@".

If you can't do that then you should drop privileges while you do the git pull command.

sudo -u <original_user> git fetch git+ssh:// 

You can use the ${SUDO_USER} enviroment variable to find out who the original user was.

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No, this would not work. User may have ssh agent set up, and, furthermore, the program has no way to know the name of an identity file (user may even not have one). –  Alexander Gladysh Jan 4 '11 at 9:35
    
Then you should drop privileges while you do the git pull command. sudo -u <original_user> git fetch git+ssh:// –  Mihai Claudiu Toader Jan 4 '11 at 9:37
    
Good idea. Is there a way to know the name of the user? –  Alexander Gladysh Jan 4 '11 at 10:29
    
Googled it up: ${SUDO_USER} environment variable. Please add another answer with this information, and I will accept it. Thanks! –  Alexander Gladysh Jan 4 '11 at 10:31
    
I have updated the post. –  Mihai Claudiu Toader Jan 4 '11 at 10:33
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