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(I have tested this with a vanilla asp.net site running from the webdev server and it is a problem here also):

I have the following markup in my .master file

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head runat="server">
    <link href="/Styles/Site.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" />
    <link rel="alternate" type="application/rss+xml" title="rss" href="/Pages/Static/Feed.aspx?type=rss&lang=en" />    
</head>

the rendered html comes out like this:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
    <link href="/Styles/Site.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" />
    <link rel="alternate" type="application/rss+xml" title="asdsad" href="/Pages/Static/Feed.aspx?type=rss&amp;lang=en" />
</head>

(the rss link "&" has been encoded to "&")

however if i change the markup to

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
    <link href="/Styles/Site.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" />
    <link rel="alternate" type="application/rss+xml" title="rss" href="/Pages/Static/Feed.aspx?type=rss&lang=en" />    
</head>

(no runat="server" on the head tag) then the resulting html comes out as expected:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head runat="server">
    <link href="/Styles/Site.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" />
    <link rel="alternate" type="application/rss+xml" title="rss" href="/Pages/Static/Feed.aspx?type=rss&lang=en" />    
</head>

Clearly Asp.Net does something to encode the url. As it happens, I really need the head tag to be runat="server" and I would also like to be able to have "&" in link-urls within it is there some trick I can use to have my cake and eat it too?

Yours Andreas

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2 Answers 2

This issue happened to me before, I couldn't find out the reason for this, I ended up putting a literal inside the head, and filled the html from the code behind. html:

<head runat="server">
    <asp:Literal runat="server" ID='litLinks' />
</head>

C# code:

protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
  litLinks.Text = "<link rel='alternate' type='application/rss+xml' title='rss' href='/Pages/Static/Feed.aspx?type=rss&lang=en' />"
                  + "<link href='/Styles/Site.css' rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' />";
}
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You're meant to escape ampersands in url's since putting a non-escaped ampersand in a url, the browser expects there to be something encoded. By escaping it, your telling the browser exactly what it is, an ampersand.

It doesn't break your links and is valid.

Also if you wanted to pass an actual ampersand in a url that isn't defining a new querystring paramter, then you would url encode the ampersand to be '%26'

Edit: Since you're probably using this in some really weird way. Here's the why, it's correct for ASP.Net to HTML Encode the ampersand for the HTML document.

When the browser issues a request for the URL, it doesn't send a request for the HTML encoded URL, it sends a request for the non-HTML encoded URL.

If for some reason you're accessing the value server-side or something, then you can do something like:

var url = new Uri(HttpUtility.HtmlDecode(@"http://www.google.com/somepage.aspx?key1=value1&key2=value2"));
var query = HttpUtility.ParseQueryString(url.Query);
var result = query["key2"];
Console.WriteLine(result);

So you decode the HTML version of the link first, parse it as a Uri, get the querystring from it and key your key/value collection.

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if I escape the url then I cannot access the second parameter, at least not through the asp.net HttpRequest class, I would have to hand-code some parsing logic to do that. the second parameter is suddenly named "amp;lang" instead of just "lang" which I am expecting –  AndreasKnudsen Jan 4 '11 at 10:40
1  
Not sure why you down-voted it but if you can't access it then you're doing it wrong. –  Phill Jan 4 '11 at 10:42
1  
Here, googled it for you and picked off the first link to do with Ampersands and URL's. htmlhelp.com/tools/validator/problems.html#amp –  Phill Jan 4 '11 at 10:47
    
I'm not doing anything, I'm using the standard asp.net framework. if the framework encodes the urls on the way out and then cannot read them on the way in then it would appear to be a bug in the framework. The urls are only encoded within head and only when head is runat="server" The question remains: how to handle this within asp.net –  AndreasKnudsen Jan 4 '11 at 11:11
1  
It's encoded because that is the correct way to format a URL in HTML. When the browser issues a request for that resource, it doesn't issue the request with & amp;, it issues a request for &. So what ever you're doing out-side of the norm of how URL's with between the browser and server, is wrong. –  Phill Jan 4 '11 at 11:23

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