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In C++, I have to implement several algorithms, which represent different ways to compute the same thing.

I thought about using an interface to represent the different algorithm.

class AlgorithmInterface
{
  public:
    virtual double ComputeSomething(void* parameter) = 0;
}

class AlgorithmImplementation1: public AlgorithmInterface
{
  public:
    virtual double ComputeSomething(void* parameter) { /* implementation */}
}

class AlgorithmImplementation2: public AlgorithmInterface
{
  public:
    virtual double ComputeSomething(void* parameter) { /* implementation */}
}

However the parameter (a void* in the previous example) for each of these are different, how can I represent them generically ?

I used a void* for the example, just because I do not know how to represent this. Please tell me how I should do this: should I make the equivalent inheritance for the parameters and cast them ? (this seems ugly to me)

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1  
The question is whether they do belong to the same hierarchy if the interfaces are different altogether... i.e. calling code cannot use the different implementations generally, but has to know which implementation it will call before composing the arguments that will be passed into the algorithm. Why should they all be AlgorithmInterface if they have different interfaces? –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jan 4 '11 at 12:38
    
David, I mostly wanted to avoid switch statements all over the place. –  BlueTrin Jan 4 '11 at 13:04
    
You need to properly @address people in comment replies, or your replies won't show up in their Responses tab. –  sbi Jan 4 '11 at 21:49
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5 Answers

You can pass the parameters in the constructor.
Additionally make the virtual member private and make the object a functor:

class AlgorithmInterface
{
  public:
     double operator()() {return this->ComputeSomething();}
  private:
    virtual double ComputeSomething() = 0;
}

class AlgorithmImplementation1: public AlgorithmInterface
{
    virtual double ComputeSomething() { /* implementation */}
    public:
        AlgorithmImplementation1(Parameter 1);
}

class AlgorithmImplementation2: public AlgorithmInterface
{
    virtual double ComputeSomething() { /* implementation */}
    public:
        AlgorithmImplementation2(Item a1,Item a2);
}

int main()
{
    AlgorithmImplementation2   job(Item(12), Iterm(13));

    double result = job(); // execute;
}
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It is valid but I would have liked to make the instance of Implementation uniques. I was about to put them in a singleton. The reason for this is that the parameter is more of a parameter for the method rather than a global setting for the method. –  BlueTrin Jan 4 '11 at 12:24
    
+1: Converted the original problem into something sensible --in the question code, AlgorithmInterface does not define an interface--, and used NVI to separate the user interface from the implementation interface --what AlgorithmInterface offers to users, from what it requires from implementations. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jan 4 '11 at 12:41
1  
@BlueTrin: if you only register references to your parameters, then the AlgorithmImpl object will be lightweight. You certainly won't gain anything from making it a singleton. –  Matthieu M. Jan 4 '11 at 16:23
    
@Matthieu: This is true but I find that it is strange to pass the arguments in the constructor instead of passing them in the virtual method itself. Is it standard practice in C++ ? To me, it looks logical that the argument should be passed in ComputeSomething(). –  BlueTrin Jan 5 '11 at 10:13
1  
@BlueTrin: I share your feelings, but I had to do something similar before and using the constructor was certainly the cleanest approach i could come up with. It makes sense when you think of functions like Haskell does (with currying): you first bundle the function and its parameters before actually executing it (and possibly not executing it if you realize you do not need the result after all). –  Matthieu M. Jan 5 '11 at 10:19
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(Based on my understanding of your question) If the computation remains the same and just the parameter types vary, then you can use templates..

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One other possibility would be to pass in a "parameter stream" to the algorithms. An algorithm could take a reference to a ParameterStream.

The derived algorithms would then extract the appropriate types (number) of parameters from the stream accordingly. The stream implements type safe extraction (de-serialization) of the parameters, and could also implement (if desired) versioning.

This possibility would IMHO have the advantage that you can keep the interface immutable even if in the future different algorithms will need a different number of parameters.

So basically you would send a parameter that contains a serialized form of the parameters you need and you de-serialize/validate them as you need them in the algorithm implementation.

As mentioned by the previous posters templates could also an option if things are clear cut at compile time.

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Either you use classic OO (run-time) polymorphism, in which case the parameter needs to be a base class pointer/reference, to which derived class objects can be passed, or you switch to templates and compile-time polymorphism, as the STL does, and pass the algorithm and the parameter as an instance of a template parameter.

With templates, this is what your code might look like:

class AlgorithmImplementation1
{
  public:
    virtual double ComputeSomething(Param1* parameter) const
    { /* implementation */}
}

class AlgorithmImplementation1
{
  public:
    virtual double ComputeSomething(Param2* parameter) const
    { /* implementation */}
}

template< typename Algorithm >
void use_algorithm(const Algorithm& algorithm)
{
  // ...
  // get_parameter() _must_ return whatever the algorithm takes
  double d = algorithm( get_parameter() );
  // ...
}

Param1 get_parameter();

void f()
{
  use_algorithm( AlgorithmImplementation1() );
}
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Liak and sbi, I am not very experienced with templates, and even less when I have to combine them with inheritance, do you have a link to some examples ? –  BlueTrin Jan 4 '11 at 12:25
1  
@BlueTrin: Done. Does that help? –  sbi Jan 4 '11 at 21:55
    
It does, let me try your solution and Martin York solutions to see which one looks the cleanest when implemented. I do not know why nobody voted your solution up (aside from me). –  BlueTrin Jan 5 '11 at 10:14
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Do you really need the inheritance? If you do, then templating the function will not be an option (i.e. you cannot have a virtual function template - at least in the current standard) and Martin's solution works. If you don't need inheritance, then the below should suffice

class AlgorithmImplementation1
{
  public:
    template <typename ParamType>
      double ComputeSomething(ParamType const& parameter) { /* implementation */}
}

class AlgorithmImplementation2
{
  public:
    template <typename ParamType>
      double ComputeSomething(ParamType const& parameter) { /* implementation */}
}

This of course depends on how you plan to use parameter, you may be better off using overloading (for example, treat int different to string), if your parameter has a consistent interface then the function template will suffice.

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