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I have a ChoiceField in my form class, presumably a list of users. How do I prepopulate this with a list of users from my User model?

What I have now is:

class MatchForm(forms.Form):

  choices = []

  user1_auto = forms.CharField()
  user1 = forms.ChoiceField(choices=choices)
  user2_auto = forms.CharField()
  user2 = forms.ChoiceField(choices=choices)

  def __init__(self):
      user_choices = User.objects.all()
      for choice in user_choices:
          self.choices.append(
              (choice.id, choice.get_full_name())
          )

This doesn't seem to work (otherwise I wouldn't be here). Thoughts?

To clarify, when I attempt to render this form in a template, it simply outputs nothing, unless I remove the ChoiceFields and __init__() method.

Also, what if I only want a list of the users' full names in my field? That is, I'd like to control the display output of each user object (so ModelChoiceField isn't really an option).

share|improve this question
    
"It doesn't work" - how? Does it display an error? Does it display the wrong choices? Does it cause your computer to spontaneously combust? –  Dominic Rodger Jan 4 '11 at 11:56
    
Why aren't you using a ForeignKey for this? A drop-down list that refers to a table is what an FK is. Why not use that? –  S.Lott Jan 4 '11 at 11:57
    
The form simply won't render unless I remove the custom init.py and ChoiceFields. –  Sri Raghavan Jan 4 '11 at 17:22
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2 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

It looks like you may be looking for ModelChoiceField.

user2 = forms.ModelChoiceField(queryset=User.objects.all())

This won't show fullnames, though, it'll just call __unicode__ on each object to get the displayed value.

Where you don't just want to display __unicode__, I do something like this:

class MatchForm(forms.Form):
    user1 = forms.ChoiceField(choices = [])

    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        super(MatchForm, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)
        self.fields['user1'].choices = [(x.pk, x.get_full_name()) for x in User.objects.all()]
share|improve this answer
    
what do I do if I need the fullnames rather than __unicode__? –  Sri Raghavan Jan 4 '11 at 23:28
    
@Sri - see my edit. –  Dominic Rodger Jan 5 '11 at 8:35
    
That's exactly what I ended up doing. –  Sri Raghavan Jan 5 '11 at 10:02
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class MatchForm(forms.Form):
  choices = tuple(User.objects.all().values_list())

  user1_auto = forms.CharField()
  user1 = forms.ChoiceField(choices=choices)
  user2_auto = forms.CharField()
  user2 = forms.ChoiceField(choices=choices)

This should work.

share|improve this answer
    
It isn't dynamic though. The first time that code is run, the list of users will be set forever, and any Users added later will not appear in the form. –  Dominic Rodger Jan 4 '11 at 12:50
    
@Dominic What do you mean by 'not dynamic'? Will this refresh the list of users every time I use the form? –  Sri Raghavan Jan 4 '11 at 17:29
    
@Sri - no. Per my previous comment - the first time that code is run, the list of Users will be set forever, and any Users added later will not appear in the form, most likely until your webserver is restarted. –  Dominic Rodger Jan 4 '11 at 23:19
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