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I have an class Item that represents an item in a list. I have in it function that calls stored procedure that returns datatable and I need to convert the datatable to Array of items. Here is what I do:

public class Item
{
    private string _ItemIdDataName = "item_id";
    private string _ItemNameDataName = "item_name";
    private string _PriceDataName = "price";

    public long ItemId { get; set; }
    public string ItemName { get; set; }
    public float Price { get; set; }

    private Item(DataRow row)
    {
        if (row != null)
        {
            ItemId = long.Parse(row[_ItemIdDataName].ToString());
            ItemName = row[_ItemNameDataName].ToString();
            Price = float.Parse(row[_PriceDataName].ToString());
        }
    }

    public Item[] load()
    {
        DataTable dt=DBHandler.GetItems();//Stored procedure that returns DataTable 
        Item[] items = new Item[dt.Rows.Count];
        for (int i = 0; i < dt.Rows.Count; i++)
        {
            items[i] = new Item(dt.Rows[i]);
        }
        return items;
    }
}

Am I doing it right? How can I improve this?

share|improve this question
1  
Why is load() inside Item class? –  as-cii Jan 4 '11 at 12:59
    
Because it looks very meanningless to put it under different class. I have many cases like this one and I cannot have hundred of classes that only returns query result. –  Naor Jan 4 '11 at 13:45
    
@Naor make it static at least.. –  nawfal Dec 11 '13 at 19:07

4 Answers 4

up vote 12 down vote accepted

If you're only gonna use it once it probably fine, but if you'll do it a lot you should try to do some more generic stuff. I wrote a blog post about how to write an extension method for DataTable that creates a list of objects. It works by the convention that the properties in the object should have the same name as the columns in the stored procedure (I would change the name in the stored procedure if I could):

public static class DataTableExtensions
{
    public static IList<T> ToList<T>(this DataTable table) where T : new()
    {
        IList<PropertyInfo> properties = typeof(T).GetProperties().ToList();
        IList<T> result = new List<T>();

        foreach (var row in table.Rows)
        {
            var item = CreateItemFromRow<T>((DataRow)row, properties);
            result.Add(item);
        }

        return result;
    }

    public static IList<T> ToList<T>(this DataTable table, Dictionary<string, string> mappings) where T : new()
    {
        IList<PropertyInfo> properties = typeof(T).GetProperties().ToList();
        IList<T> result = new List<T>();

        foreach (var row in table.Rows)
        {
            var item = CreateItemFromRow<T>((DataRow)row, properties, mappings);
            result.Add(item);
        }

        return result;
    }

    private static T CreateItemFromRow<T>(DataRow row, IList<PropertyInfo> properties) where T : new()
    {
        T item = new T();
        foreach (var property in properties)
        {
            property.SetValue(item, row[property.Name], null);
        }
        return item;
    }

    private static T CreateItemFromRow<T>(DataRow row, IList<PropertyInfo> properties, Dictionary<string, string> mappings) where T : new()
    {
        T item = new T();
        foreach (var property in properties)
        {
            if(mappings.ContainsKey(property.Name))
                property.SetValue(item, row[mappings[property.Name]], null);
        }
        return item;
    }
}

Now you can just call

var items = dt.ToList<Item>();

or

var mappings = new Dictionary<string,string>();
mappings.Add("ItemId", "item_id");
mappings.Add("ItemName ", "item_name");
mappings.Add("Price ", "price);
var items = dt.ToList<Item>(mappings);

The blog post is here: http://blog.tomasjansson.com/2010/11/convert-datatable-to-generic-list-extension

There are many ways in which you can extend this, you could include some kind of mapping dictionary telling the extension how to map the columns, in that way the names doesn't need to match. Or you can add a list of property names that you would like to exclude in the mapping.

Update: Your object (Item) you are creating must have a default constructor otherwise the private method won't be able to create it. Since the way the solution works is first to create the object than use the properties that you get from the reflection to set the values of the object.

Update 2: I added the part with mappings dictionary but haven't tried it myself so it might not compile. However, the concept is there and I think it works.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice answer. Reusability+ –  Will Hughes Jan 4 '11 at 12:52
    
Thank you... I was trying to just keep it simple, and it isn't that hard to match your object properties against the columns in the stored procedure :). –  Tomas Jansson Jan 4 '11 at 12:55
1  
Here you assume that db fields names are equale to the members names. What is not always true. Am I wrong? –  Naor Jan 4 '11 at 13:02
1  
You are 100 % correct, and I says so in the answer as well. When I implemented this I tried to keep the object properties aligned with the name of the columns to make it easier and it worked perfectly fine. If that is not the case you can change the extension method to also take a Dictionary<string, string> that maps the property name to column name, see update in a couple of minutes. –  Tomas Jansson Jan 4 '11 at 13:07
1  
Nice answer, but beware properties without public setters! See: stackoverflow.com/questions/2811198/… –  Yehuda Shapira Jul 30 '14 at 8:05

Pretty good, but I have a few suggestions:

  • Don't cast things ToString to be parsed back to another type. This can cause corruption of your data type, and is slow/inefficient.

  • Expect and check for null's coming from SQL Server.

So, instead of:

ItemId = long.Parse(row[_ItemIdDataName].ToString());

Try:

 ItemId = row.Field<long?>(_ItemIdDataName) ?? value_if_null; 

(Add a reference to System.Data.DatasetExtensions to get the Field extension)

share|improve this answer

Perfect job for AutoMapper.

Two examples:

http://house9.blogspot.com/2010/11/automapper-datatable-to-list.html

http://www.geekytidbits.com/automapper-with-datatables/

share|improve this answer
    
Dude! 2 YEARS!! –  Naor Mar 24 '13 at 9:33
2  
@Naor Indeed - but this was asked well after AutoMapper existed, and this still comes up in google searches looking for an answer. StackOverflow is for finding the best answers, not for ensuring the conversation ties up nicely and is then closed - if that's what you wanted, use Google Groups. –  Chris Moschini Mar 24 '13 at 19:39
    
this answer must be marked as "Answer" –  Nitin Sawant Mar 19 '14 at 11:58

Your private Item constructor and the load() functions do not seem to belong in your Item class.

You know, a class should do one thing and one thing well.

So try to
1. refactor out the private c'tor to a say a helper class that simply parses the DataRow and returns an instance of Item
2. and refactor the load() into a different class that simply uses the above helper method and returns an array of Item object instances

share|improve this answer
    
This way will make me create many many classes. I want to put things together if there is a connection. I ran out of names to classes.. –  Naor Jan 4 '11 at 12:58
    
@Naor: I am just answering your main questions ;) –  Sung Jan 4 '11 at 13:05

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