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Is there a way that I can create a function that takes an int template parameter, and have that function give a compile time error if the value passed to the function is less than 10?

The following code does not work, but it shows what I want to accomplish:

template <int number1>
void reportErrorIfLessThan10()
{
    #if(number1 < 10)
        #error the number is less than 10
    #endif
}


int maint(int argc, char**argv)
{
   reportErrorIfLessThan10<5>();//report an error!
   reportErrorIfLessThan10<12>();//ok
   return 0;
}
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4 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

If you don't want Boost C++ Libraries magic and want bare bones...

template<bool> class static_check
{
};

template<> class static_check<false>
{
private: static_check();
};

#define StaticAssert(test) static_check<(test) != 0>()

Then use StaticAssert. It's a #define for me because I have code that needs to run in a lot of environments where C++ doesn't work right for templates and I need to just back it off to a runtime assert. :(

Also, not the best error messages.

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You could always use a typedef with a negative sub-script like I posted, if you can't use templates. Something like, #define StaticAssert(test) typedef char static_assert ## __LINE__[(test) ? -1 :1]; –  Jasper Bekkers Jan 19 '09 at 22:45
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If for some reason you can't use Boost, this example is trivially written like this:

template <int number1>
void reportErrorIfLessThan10()
{
    typedef char number1_gt_10[number1 > 10 ? 1 : -1];
}


int maint(int argc, char**argv)
{
   reportErrorIfLessThan10<5>();//report an error!
   reportErrorIfLessThan10<12>();//ok
   return 0;
}

Or more generic

#define static_assert(test, message) typedef char static_assert_at_ ## __LINE__[(test) ? 1 : -1];

I'm not concatenating the error message itself, because I feel that static_assert(true, "some message"); is more readable than say static_assert(true, some_message);. However, this does limit the use case to only one assert per line.

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The array bounds must be moved to the end of the line. Also, semicolon. –  Konrad Rudolph Jan 19 '09 at 22:30
    
After all these years of C++, I still have trouble doing a normal typedef. Ugh. –  Jasper Bekkers Jan 19 '09 at 22:37
    
This #define code fails for me: The compiler does syntax check of false branches. The template specialization method works better. –  A Fog Apr 27 '12 at 12:25
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template <int number1>
typename boost::enable_if_c< (number1 >= 10) >::type 
reportErrorIfLessThan10() {
    // ...
}

The above enable_if, without the _c because we have a plain bool, looks like this:

template<bool C, typename T = void>
struct enable_if {
  typedef T type;
};

template<typename T>
struct enable_if<false, T> { };

Boost's enable_if takes not a plain bool, so they have another version which has a _c appended, that takes plain bools. You won't be able to call it for number1 < 10. SFINAE will exclude that template as possible candidates, because enable_if will not expose a type ::type if the condition evaluates to false. If you want, for some reason, test it in the function, then if you have the C++1x feature available, you can use static_assert:

template <int number1>
void reportErrorIfLessThan10() {
    static_assert(number >= 10, "number must be >= 10");
}

If not, you can use BOOST_STATIC_ASSERT:

template <int number1>
void reportErrorIfLessThan10() {
    BOOST_STATIC_ASSERT(number >= 10);
}

The only way to display a descriptive message is using static_assert, though. You can more or less simulate that, using types having names that describe the error condition:

namespace detail {
    /* chooses type A if cond == true, chooses type B if cond == false */
    template <bool cond, typename A, typename B>
    struct Condition {
      typedef A type;
    };

    template <typename A, typename B>
    struct Condition<false, A, B> {
      typedef B type;
    };

    struct number1_greater_than_10;
}

template <int number1>
void reportErrorIfLessThan10() {
    // number1 must be greater than 10
    sizeof( typename detail::Condition< (number1 >= 10), 
             char, 
             detail::number1_greater_than_10 
            >::type ); 
}

It prints this here:

error: invalid application of 'sizeof' to incomplete type 'detail::number1_greater_than_10'

But I think the very first approach, using enable_if will do it. You will get an error message about an undeclared reportErrorIfLessThan10.

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litb and Joe have already given the answers used in practice. Just to illustrate how this can be done manually by specializing for the number in question (rather than a general boolean condition):

template <int N>
struct helper : helper<N - 1> { };

template <>
struct helper<10> { typedef void type; };

template <>
struct helper<0> { }; // Notice: missing typedef.

template <int N>
typename helper<N>::type error_if_less_than_10() {
}

int main() {
    error_if_less_than_10<10>();
    error_if_less_than_10<9>();
}

Functions cannot be inherited but classes (and structs) can. Therefore, this code also uses a struct that automatically and dynamically generates cases for all N except 10 and 0, which are the hard-coded recursion begins.

By the way, the above code actually gives quite nice error messages:

x.cpp:16: error: no matching function for call to 'error_if_less_than_10()'
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Just remember that most compiler have a limit on the depth of the recursion you do. Last time I checked, GCC defaulted to 50 or so. However, I don't know if the same holds true for this type of inheritance. –  Jasper Bekkers Jan 19 '09 at 22:55
    
Well, that test is linear. That is, you will get instantiations for every N from your input down to 10 or 0. so if you set N=20000, you get 19990 base-classes. I crashed my operation system once, while trying to create too much instantiations of templates. it at least needs -ftemplate-depth-XXX :) –  Johannes Schaub - litb Jan 19 '09 at 22:55
    
Yea, as I said, this code is more for illustration purposes than for anything else. There's no reason (technical or otherwise) to prefer this solution over the others. –  Konrad Rudolph Jan 19 '09 at 23:09
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